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Why are educated and risk-loving persons more mobile across regions?

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  • Bauernschuster, Stefan
  • Falck, Oliver
  • Heblich, Stephan
  • Suedekum, Jens

Abstract

Why are better educated and more risk-friendly persons more mobile across regions? To answer this question, we use micro data on internal migrants from the German Socio- Economic Panel (SOEP) 2000 - 2006 and merge this information with a unique proxy for region-pair-specific cultural distances across German regions constructed from historical local dialect patterns. Our findings indicate that risk-loving and skilled people are more mobile over longer distances because they are more willing to cross cultural boundaries and move to regions that are culturally different from their homes. Other types of distance-related migration costs cannot explain the lower distance sensitivity of educated and risk-loving individuals. --

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Heinrich‐Heine‐Universität Düsseldorf, Düsseldorf Institute for Competition Economics (DICE) in its series DICE Discussion Papers with number 123.

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Date of creation: 2013
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Handle: RePEc:zbw:dicedp:123

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Keywords: Migration; Culture; Distance; Human Capital; Risk Attitudes;

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  1. Gordon B. Dahl, 2002. "Mobility and the Return to Education: Testing a Roy Model with Multiple Markets," RCER Working Papers 488, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).
  2. Felbermayr, Gabriel & Toubal, Farid, 2010. "Cultural proximity and trade," Munich Reprints in Economics 20351, University of Munich, Department of Economics.
  3. Mélitz, Jacques, 2002. "Language and Foreign Trade," CEPR Discussion Papers 3590, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
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  14. Victor Ginsburgh & Shlomo Weber, 2011. "How many languages do we need? The economics of Linguistic Diversity," ULB Institutional Repository 2013/152424, ULB -- Universite Libre de Bruxelles.
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  18. repec:hal:journl:halshs-00641280 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Stefan Bauernschuster & Oliver Falck, 2014. "Culture, Spatial Diffusion of Ideas and their Long-Lasting Imprints - Evidence from Froebel's Kindergarten Movement," CESifo Working Paper Series 4749, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. Nina Neubecker, 2013. "Low Occupational Prestige and Internal Migration in Germany," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 562, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).

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