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The Impact of College on Migration: Evidence from the Vietnam Generation

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  • Ofer Malamud
  • Abigail Wozniak

Abstract

We examine the causal effect of education on migration using variation in college attainment due to draft-avoidance behavior during the Vietnam War. We use national and state-level induction risk to identify both college attainment and veteran status for men observed in the 1980 Census. 2SLS estimates imply that additional years of college significantly increased the likelihood that affected men resided outside their birth states later in life. Most of our estimates suggest a causal impact of higher education on migration that is larger in magnitude but not significantly different from the OLS estimates.

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File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/47/4/913
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Wisconsin Press in its journal Journal of Human Resources.

Volume (Year): 47 (2012)
Issue (Month): 4 ()
Pages: 913-950

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Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:47:y:2012:iv:1:p:913-950

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Web page: http://jhr.uwpress.org/

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Cited by:
  1. Bauernschuster, Stefan & Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Suedekum, Jens, 2012. "Why Are Educated and Risk-Loving Persons More Mobile Across Regions?," IZA Discussion Papers 6860, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Li Hao & Daniel Houser & Lei Mao & Marie Claire Villeval, 2014. "A Field Study of Chinese Migrant Workers' Attitudes Toward Risks, Strategic Uncertainty, and Competitiveness," Working Papers 1047, George Mason University, Interdisciplinary Center for Economic Science.
  3. McHenry, Peter, 2013. "The relationship between schooling and migration: Evidence from compulsory schooling laws," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 24-40.
  4. Hao, Li & Houser, Daniel & Mao, Lei & Villeval, Marie Claire, 2014. "A Field Study of Chinese Migrant Workers' Attitudes toward Risks, Strategic Uncertainty, and Competitiveness," IZA Discussion Papers 8227, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  5. Sjoquist, David L. & Winters, John V., 2014. "Merit aid and post-college retention in the state," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 80(C), pages 39-50.
  6. Michelle Miller-Adams & Bridget Timmeney, 2013. "The Impact of the Kalamazoo Promise on College Choice: An Analysis of Kalamazoo Area Math and Science Center Graduates," Upjohn Working Papers and Journal Articles 2013-014, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research.
  7. Winters, John V., 2013. "STEM Graduates, Human Capital Externalities, and Wages in the U.S," IZA Discussion Papers 7830, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Sjoquist, David L. & Winters, John V., 2013. "The effects of HOPE on post-college retention in the Georgia workforce," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(3), pages 479-490.

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