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The evaluation of health policies through microsimulation methods

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  • Zucchelli, E
  • Jones, A.M
  • Rice, N

Abstract

This paper presents an overview of microsimulation as a method to evaluate health and health care policies and interventions. After presenting a brief survey of microsimulation models and applications we describe the main features of the approach and how these are implemented in practice. We pay particular attention to the innovative features of dynamic microsimulation as a method of ex-ante policy evaluation. The final section describes two leading microsimulation models, POHEM and FEM used to simulate lifecycle health trajectories and associated health care costs under competing policy scenarios to illustrate the power of microsimulation as a valid and relevant tool for policy evaluation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York in its series Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers with number 10/03.

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Date of creation: Jan 2010
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Handle: RePEc:yor:hectdg:10/03

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Postal: HEDG/HERC, Department of Economics and Related Studies, University of York, York, YO10 5DD, United Kingdom
Phone: (0)1904 323776
Fax: (0)1904 323759
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Web page: http://www.york.ac.uk/economics/postgrad/herc/hedg/
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Keywords: Microsimulation methods; policy evaluation; health; public health interventions;

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References

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Cited by:
  1. Li, Jinjing & O'Donoghue, Cathal, 2012. "A methodological survey of dynamic microsimulation models," MERIT Working Papers 002, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).
  2. Laurie Brown, 2011. "Editorial - Special Issue on Health," International Journal of Microsimulation, Interational Microsimulation Association, vol. 4(3), pages 1-2.

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