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Can Africa replicate Asia's green revolution in rice ?

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Author Info

  • Larson, Donald F.
  • Otsuka, Keijiro
  • Kajisa, Kei
  • Estudillo, Jonna
  • Diagne, Aliou

Abstract

Asia's green revolution in rice was transformational and improved the lives of millions of poor households. Rice has become an increasingly important part of African diets and imports of rice have grown. Agronomists point out that large areas in Africa are well suited for rice and are encouraged by the field tests of new rice varieties. So is Africa poised for its own green revolution in rice? This study reviews the recent literature on rice technologies and their impact on productivity, incomes, and poverty, and compares current conditions in Africa with the conditions that prevailed in Asia as its rice revolution got under way. An important conclusion is that, to a degree, a rice revolution has already begun in Africa. Moreover, many of the same practices that have proved successful in Asia and in Africa can be applied where yields are currently low. At the same time, for many reasons, Africa's rice revolution has been, and will continue to be, characterized by a mosaic of successes, situated where the conditions are right for new technologies to take hold. This can have profound effects in some places. But because diets, markets, and geography are heterogeneous in Africa, the successful transformation of the Africa's rice sector must be matched by productivity gains in other crops to fully launch Africa's Green Revolution.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 5478.

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Date of creation: 01 Nov 2010
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:5478

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Keywords: Agricultural Research; Crops&Crop Management Systems; Climate Change and Agriculture; Food&Beverage Industry; Agricultural Knowledge&Information Systems;

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References

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Time for an agricultural revolution in Africa?
    by Economic Logician in Economic Logic on 2011-01-06 15:31:00
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Cited by:
  1. Kijima, Yoko, 2012. "Expansion of Lowland Rice Production and Constraints on a Rice Green Revolution: Evidence from Uganda," Working Papers 49, JICA Research Institute.
  2. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
  3. Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro & Futakuchi, Koichi, 2013. "The development of agricultural markets in sub-Saharan Africa: the case of rice in Uganda," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), October.

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