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Assessing the impact of NERICA on income and poverty in central and western Uganda

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  • Yoko Kijima
  • Keijiro Otsuka
  • Dick Sserunkuuma

Abstract

Persistent food shortage and poverty in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) are major development issues. New Rice for Africa (NERICA) was developed to boost crop yield and income of rural households in SSA. Although its high-yielding traits have become fairly well known, there is no empirical analysis of its impact on income and poverty. By taking the case of Uganda where a NERICA promoting program was initiated as one of the major poverty eradication measures, this study attempts to compare actual income with the hypothetical income without NERICA. We found that introduction of NERICA decreases poverty to a significant extent without deteriorating income distribution. Copyright (c)2008 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 38 (2008)
Issue (Month): 3 (05)
Pages: 327-337

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Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:38:y:2008:i:3:p:327-337

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Cited by:
  1. Kassie, Menale & Shiferaw, Bekele & Muricho, Geoffrey, 2011. "Agricultural Technology, Crop Income, and Poverty Alleviation in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(10), pages 1784-1795.
  2. Dontsop Nguezet, Paul Martin & Diagne, Aliou & Okoruwa, Victor O. & Ojehomon, Vivian E.T., 2012. "Estimation of Actual and Potential Adoption Rates and Determinants of NERICA Rice Varieties in Nigeria," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126069, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  3. Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2011. "An Inquiry into Constraints on a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of NERICA Rice in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 77-86, January.
  4. Kijima, Yoko & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2013. "The adoption of NERICA rice varieties at the initial stage of the diffusion process in Uganda," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(1), July.
  5. Nakano, Yuko & Kajisa, Kei, 2012. "How does the Adoption of Modern Variety increase Productivity and Income? : A Case of the Rice Sector in Tanzania," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124924, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  6. Larson, Donald F. & Otsuka, Keijiro & Kajisa, Kei & Estudillo, Jonna & Diagne, Aliou, 2010. "Can Africa replicate Asia's green revolution in rice ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5478, The World Bank.
  7. Kijima, Yoko, 2012. "Expansion of Lowland Rice Production and Constraints on a Rice Green Revolution: Evidence from Uganda," Working Papers 49, JICA Research Institute.
  8. Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro & Futakuchi, Koichi, 2013. "The development of agricultural markets in sub-Saharan Africa: the case of rice in Uganda," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), October.
  9. Adekambi, Souleimane Adeyemi & Diagne, Aliou & Simtowe, Franklin & Biaou, Gauthier, 2009. "The Impact of Agricultural Technology Adoption on Poverty: The case of NERICA rice varieties in Benin," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51645, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  10. Shiferaw, Bekele & Kassie, Menale & Jaleta, Moti & Yirga, Chilot, 2014. "Adoption of improved wheat varieties and impacts on household food security in Ethiopia," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 272-284.
  11. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
  12. Simtowe, Franklin & Kassie, Menale & Asfaw, Solomon & Shiferaw, Bekele A. & Monyo, Emmanuel & Siambi, Moses, 2012. "Welfare Effects of Agricultural Technology adoption: the case of improved groundnut varieties in rural Malawi," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126761, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  13. Nakano, Yuko & Bamba, Ibrahim & Diagne, Aliou & Otsuka, Keijiro & Kajisa, Kei, 2011. "The possibility of a rice green revolution in large-scale irrigation schemes in Sub-Saharan Africa," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5560, The World Bank.
  14. Kassie, Menale & Jaleta, Moti & Shiferaw, Bekele A. & Mmbando, Frank & De Groote, Hugo, 2012. "Improved Maize Technologies and Welfare Outcomes In Smallholder Systems: Evidence From Application of Parametric and Non-Parametric Approaches," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 128004, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  15. Tomoya Matsumoto, 2013. "Disseminating New Farming Practices among Small Scale Farmers: An Experimental Intervention in Uganda," GRIPS Discussion Papers 13-18, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
  16. Diagne, Aliou & Sogbossi, Marie-Josee & Simtowe, Franklin & Diawara, Sekou & Diallo, Abdoulaye Sadio & Barry, Alpha Bacar, 2009. "Estimation of Actual and potential adoption rates and determinants of a new technology not universally known in the population: The case of NERICA rice varieties in Guinea," 2009 Conference, August 16-22, 2009, Beijing, China 51644, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  17. Lazzaroni, Sara, 2013. "Weather variability and food consumption: Evidence from rural Uganda," 2013 Second Congress, June 6-7, 2013, Parma, Italy 149774, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).

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