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Fertilizer Use in African Agriculture : Lessons Learned and Good Practice Guidelines

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  • Michael Morris
  • Valerie A. Kelly
  • Ron J. Kopicki
  • Derek Byerlee
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    Abstract

    In every region of the world, the intensification of crop-based agriculture has been associated with a sharp increase in the use of chemical fertilizer. Given the generally low levels of fertilizer use in Africa, there can be little doubt that fertilizer use must increase in Africa if the region is to meet its agricultural growth targets, poverty reduction goals, and environmental sustainability objectives. For this reason, policies and programs are needed to encourage fertilizer use in ways that are technically efficient, economically rational, and market-friendly. Including this introduction, this report contains eight chapters. Chapter 2 sets the stage by discussing agriculture's role in the overall economic development process and explaining why agricultural development often leads to patterns of growth that are strongly pro-poor. Chapter 3 briefly recounts the history of fertilizer promotion efforts in Africa. Chapter 4 outlines the reasons for low fertilizer use in Africa. Chapter 5 examines factors that influence fertilizer demand and identifies entry points at which public interventions can strengthen effective demand at the farm level. Chapter 6 examines the factors that determine the supply of fertilizer and identifies entry points for public interventions to improve fertilizer supply. Chapter 7 identifies potential entry points at which public investments may be effective for fostering desirable change in a country's fertilizer sector. Chapter 8 summarizes the main points made in the report and concludes the discussion.

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    Bibliographic Info

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    This book is provided by The World Bank in its series World Bank Publications with number 6650 and published in 2007.

    ISBN: 0-8213-6880-X
    Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbpubs:6650

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    Postal: 1818 H Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20433
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    Web page: https://openknowledge.worldbank.org
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    Related research

    Keywords: Fertilizers and Agricultural Chemicals Industry Agriculture - Fertilizers Crops and Crop Management Systems Economic Theory and Research Macroeconomics and Economic Growth - Markets and Market Access Industry;

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    Citations

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    Cited by:
    1. Esther Duflo & Michael Kremer & Jonathan Robinson, 2009. "Nudging Farmers to Use Fertilizer: Theory and Experimental Evidence from Kenya," NBER Working Papers 15131, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Rashid, Shahidur & Tefera, Nigussie & Minot, Nicholas & Ayele, Gezahegn, 2013. "Fertilizer in Ethiopia: An assessment of policies, value chain, and profitability:," IFPRI discussion papers 1304, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    3. World Bank, 2011. "How Do We Improve Public Expenditure in Agriculture?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2825, The World Bank.
    4. Pan, Lei & Christiaensen, Luc, 2012. "Who is Vouching for the Input Voucher? Decentralized Targeting and Elite Capture in Tanzania," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1619-1633.
    5. Lunduka, Rodney & Fisher, Monica & Snapp, Sieglinde, 2012. "Could farmer interest in a diversity of seed attributes explain adoption plateaus for modern maize varieties in Malawi?," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(5), pages 504-510.
    6. Tschirley, David & Theriault, Veronique, 2013. "On the Institutional Details that Mediate the Impact of Cash Crops on Food Crop Intensification: The Case of Cotton," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 151263, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Adesina, Akinwumi A., 2013. "Global food and financial crises: lessons and imperatives for accelerating food production in Africa," African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics, African Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 8(4), October.
    8. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Did using input vouchers improve the distribution of subsidized fertilizer in Nigeria?: The case of Kano and Taraba states," IFPRI discussion papers 1231, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    9. Benin, Samuel & Johnson, Michael E. & Abokyi, Emmanuel & Ahorbo, Gerald & Jimah, Kipo & Nasser, Gamel & Owusu, Victor & Taabazuing, Joe & Tenga, Albert, 2013. "Revisiting agricultural input and farm support subsidies in Africa: The case of Ghana’s mechanization, fertilizer, block farms, and marketing programs:," IFPRI discussion papers 1300, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. World Bank, 2011. "Tackling Poverty in Northern Ghana," World Bank Other Operational Studies 2755, The World Bank.
    11. World Bank, 2010. "Improving Water Management in Rainfed Agriculture : Issues and Options in Water-Constrained Production Systems," World Bank Other Operational Studies 13028, The World Bank.
    12. Liverpool-Tasie, Lenis Saweda, 2012. "Targeted Subsidies and Private Market Participation: An Assessment of Fertilizer Demand in Nigeria:," IFPRI discussion papers 1194, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    13. World Bank, 2008. "Nigeria - Agriculture Public Expenditure Review," World Bank Other Operational Studies 7923, The World Bank.
    14. Duflo, Esther & Kremer, Michael & Robinson, Jonathan, 2009. "Nudging Farmers to Utilize Fertilizer: Theory and Experimental Evidence from Kenya," CEPR Discussion Papers 7402, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Marenya, Paswel Phiri & Nkonya, Ephraim M. & Xiong, Wei & Rossel, Jose Deustua & Edward, Kato, 2012. "Which would work better for improved soil fertility management in sub-Saharan Africa: Fertilizer Subsidies or Carbon Credits?," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126904, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    16. Mapila, Mariam A. T. J., 2013. "The impact of alternative input subsidy exit strategies on Malawi’s maize commodity market:," IFPRI discussion papers 1278, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    17. Sheahan, Megan & Black, Roy & Jayne, T.S., 2013. "Are Kenyan farmers under-utilizing fertilizer? Implications for input intensification strategies and research," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(C), pages 39-52.
    18. Larson, Donald F. & Gurara, Daniel Zerfu, 2013. "A conceptual model of incomplete markets and the consequences for technology adoption policies in Ethiopia," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6681, The World Bank.

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