Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Africa

Contents:

Author Info

  • Anderson, Kym
  • Masters, William A.

Abstract

One of every two people in Sub-Saharan Africa survives on less than $1.25 a day. That proportion has changed little over the past three decades, unlike in Asia and elsewhere, so the region's share of global poverty has risen from one-tenth to almost one-third since 1980. About 70 percent of today's 400 million poor Africans live in rural areas and depend directly or indirectly on farming for their livelihoods. While that rural share was even higher in the past, it means policies affecting the incentives for farmers to produce and sell farm products remain a major influence on the extent of Africa's poverty. The case studies help address questions such as the following: where is there still a policy bias against agricultural production? To what extent are some farmers now being protected from import competition? What are the political economic forces behind the more-successful reformers, and how do they compare with those in less-successful countries where major distortions in agricultural incentives remain? How important have domestic political forces been in bringing about reform, as compared with international forces? What explains the cross commodity pattern of distortions within the agricultural sector of each country? What policy lessons and trade implications can be drawn from these differing experiences with a view to ensuring better growth-enhancing and poverty-reducing outcomes in the study's focus countries and in the region's other economies?

(This abstract was borrowed from another version of this item.)

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/48554
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by World Bank in its series Agricultural Distortions Working Paper with number 48554.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: Dec 2007
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:ags:wbadwp:48554

Contact details of provider:
Web page: http://www.worldbank.org
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords: Distorted incentives; agricultural and trade policy reforms; national agricultural development; Agricultural and Food Policy; International Relations/Trade; F13; F14; Q17; Q18;

Other versions of this item:

Find related papers by JEL classification:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Bamou, Ernest & Masters, William A., 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Cameroon," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48518, World Bank.
  2. Kirsten, Johann F. & Edwards, Lawrence & Vink, Nick, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in South Africa," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48514, World Bank.
  3. Anderson, Kym & Masters, William A., 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Africa," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48554, World Bank.
  4. Maret, Fenohasina, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Madagascar," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48551, World Bank.
  5. Walkenhorst, Peter, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Nigeria," MPRA Paper 10055, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  6. Winter-Nelson, Alex & Argwings-Kodhek, Gem, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Kenya," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48521, World Bank.
  7. Ndlela, Daniel & Robinson, Peter, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Zimbabwe," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48515, World Bank.
  8. Faki, Hamid & Taha, Abdelmoneim, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Sudan," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48520, World Bank.
  9. Anderson, Kym & Kurzweil, Marianne & Martin, William J. & Sandri, Damiano & Valenzuela, Ernesto, 2008. "Methodology for Measuring Distortions to Agricultural Incentives," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48326, World Bank.
  10. Valenzuela, Ernesto & Kurzweil, Marianne & Croser, Johanna L. & Nelgen, Signe & Anderson, Kym, 2007. "Annual Estimates Of African Distortions To Agricultural Incentives," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48553, World Bank.
  11. Anderson, Kym, 1993. "Lobbying Incentives and the Pattern of Protection in Rich and Poor Countries," CEPR Discussion Papers 789, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  12. Brooks, Jonathan & Croppenstedt, Andre & Aggrey-Fynn, Emmanuel, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Ghana," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48523, World Bank.
  13. Matthews, Alan & Claquin, Pierre & Opolot, Jacob, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Uganda," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48549, World Bank.
  14. Abbott, Philip C., 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Cote d’Ivoire," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48522, World Bank.
  15. Morrissey, Oliver & Leyaro, Vincent, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Tanzania," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48550, World Bank.
  16. Robinson, Peter & Govereh, Jones & Ndlela, Daniel, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Zambia," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48516, World Bank.
  17. James Cassing, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Egypt," Working Papers 313, University of Pittsburgh, Department of Economics, revised Jul 2008.
  18. Anderson, Kym & Kurzweil, Marianne & Martin, Will & Sandri, Damiano & Valenzuela, Ernesto, 2008. "Measuring distortions to agricultural incentives, revisited," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4612, The World Bank.
  19. Alfieri, Andrea & Arndt, Channing & Cirera, Xavier, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Mozambique," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48552, World Bank.
  20. Baffes, John, 2007. "Distortions to Cotton Sector Incentives in West and Central Africa," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48526, World Bank.
  21. Rashid, Shahidur & Assefa, Meron & Ayele, Gezahegne, 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Ethiopia," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48519, World Bank.
  22. Masters, William A., 2007. "Distortions to Agricultural Incentives in Senegal," Agricultural Distortions Working Paper 48517, World Bank.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
This item has more than 25 citations. To prevent cluttering this page, these citations are listed on a separate page.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ags:wbadwp:48554. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (AgEcon Search).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.