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The development of agricultural markets in sub-Saharan Africa: the case of rice in Uganda

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Author Info

  • Kijima, Yoko
  • Otsuka, Keijiro
  • Futakuchi, Koichi

Abstract

If agricultural markets do not work well in sub-Saharan Africa, it will be inconceivable to increase crop yields, as this requires the increased application of purchased inputs and the marketing of increased output. This study therefore investigates whether and to what extent rice markets function in Uganda, where rice is a new crop. We found that the number of rice millers has increased in response to the increase in rice production. As the number of rice millers and traders has increased, the price differentials of milled rice across wide areas have come to depend on transportation costs, which indicates the more efficient functioning of local rice markets.

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File URL: http://purl.umn.edu/163556
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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by African Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal African Journal of Agricultural and Resource Economics.

Volume (Year): 08 (2013)
Issue (Month): 4 (October)
Pages:

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Handle: RePEc:ags:afjare:163556

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Related research

Keywords: Crop Production/Industries; International Development;

References

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  1. Tomoya Matsumoto & Yoko Kijima & Takashi Yamano, 2006. "The role of local nonfarm activities and migration in reducing poverty: evidence from Ethiopia, Kenya, and Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 35(s3), pages 449-458, November.
  2. Marcel Fafchamps & Ruth Hill, 2005. "Price Transmission and Trader Entry in Domestic Commodity Markets," Economics Series Working Papers GPRG-WPS-038, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
  3. Barrett, Christopher B., 1997. "Food marketing liberalization and trader entry: Evidence from Madagascar," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 763-777, May.
  4. Yoko Kijima & Keijiro Otsuka & Dick Sserunkuuma, 2008. "Assessing the impact of NERICA on income and poverty in central and western Uganda," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 38(3), pages 327-337, 05.
  5. Keijiro Otsuka & Yoko Kijima, 2010. "Technology Policies for a Green Revolution and Agricultural Transformation in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 19(suppl_2), pages 60-76.
  6. Yoko KIJIMA & Dick SSERUNKUUMA & Keijiro OTSUKA, 2006. "How Revolutionary Is The "Nerica Revolution"? Evidence From Uganda," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 44(2), pages 252-267.
  7. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
  8. Minot, Nicholas & Goletti, Francesco, 2000. "Rice market liberalization and poverty in Viet Nam:," Research reports 114, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  9. Haggblade, Steven & Dewina, Reno, 2010. "Staple food prices in Uganda," Food Security Collaborative Working Papers 58553, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
  10. Christine Moser & Christopher Barrett & Bart Minten, 2009. "Spatial integration at multiple scales: rice markets in Madagascar," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 40(3), pages 281-294, 05.
  11. Larson, Donald F. & Otsuka, Keijiro & Kajisa, Kei & Estudillo, Jonna & Diagne, Aliou, 2010. "Can Africa replicate Asia's green revolution in rice ?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 5478, The World Bank.
  12. Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2011. "An Inquiry into Constraints on a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of NERICA Rice in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 77-86, January.
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