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Migration,sex bias, and child growth in rural Pakistan

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  • Mansuri, Ghazala

Abstract

Temporary economic migration is undertaken largely in response to resource constraints. This is evident in the volume of remittances sent back by migrants to their families of origin. In agricultural settings, where those left behind are likely to face considerable exposure to uninsured income risk, such resource flows should translate into better risk bearing capacity. In this paper the author takes up this question by asking whether economic migration allows households to avoid costly risk coping strategies. She focuses on early child growth since there is considerable epidemiological evidence that very young children are particularly vulnerable to shocks that lead to growth faltering, with substantial long-term health consequences. The data come from rural Pakistan, where, as in the rest of Asia, son preference is substantial and there are large gender gaps in most developmental outcomes. As such, the interest is in examining also whether migration-induced resource flows allow households to extend better nutrition and health care protection to girls. Recent work on the intra-household allocation of resources and risk has also shown that gender differences in the relative burden of risk may be important and that the allocation of resources to daughters is often one margin along which poor households adjust to uninsurable transitory income shocks. After accounting for selection into migration, the results indicate that migration has a substantially larger positive impact on growth outcomes for young girls. And the growth advantage is sustained among older girls, suggesting potential intergenerational benefits of averting nutritional and other health shocks for girls in early childhood. These results are further validated by restricting the sample to migrant households and comparing the growth outcomes of siblings before and after migration.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by The World Bank in its series Policy Research Working Paper Series with number 3946.

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Date of creation: 01 Jun 2006
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Handle: RePEc:wbk:wbrwps:3946

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Keywords: Health Monitoring&Evaluation; Anthropology; Youth and Governance; Gender and Development; Adolescent Health;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Lars Osberg & Jiaping Shao & Kuan Xu, 2009. "The growth of poor children in China 1991–2000: why food subsidies may matter," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 18(S1), pages S89-S108, April.
  2. Mu, Ren & de Brauw, Alan, 2013. "Migration and Young Child Nutrition: Evidence from Rural China," IZA Discussion Papers 7466, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  3. Carletto, Calogero & Covarrubias, Katia & Maluccio, John A., 2011. "Migration and child growth in rural Guatemala," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 16-27, February.
  4. Mansuri, Ghazala, 2006. "Migration, school attainment, and child labor : evidence from rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 3945, The World Bank.
  5. Nguyen Viet Cuong & Daniel Mont, 2012. "Economic impacts of international migration and remittances on household welfare in Vietnam," International Journal of Development Issues, Emerald Group Publishing, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 11(2), pages 144-163, July.
  6. de Brauw, Alan & Mu, Ren, 2012. "Unattended but not undernourished: young children left behind in rural China:," IFPRI discussion papers, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) 1191, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Gibson, John & McKenzie, David & Stillman, Steven, 2009. "The impacts of international migration on remaining household members : omnibus results from a migration lottery program," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 4956, The World Bank.
  8. Katsushi Imai & Raghav Gaiha & Abdilahi Ali & Nidhi Kaicker, 2013. "Remittances, Growth and Poverty: New Evidence from Asian Countries," Discussion Paper Series, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University DP2013-18, Research Institute for Economics & Business Administration, Kobe University.
  9. Mauricio Cárdenas & Carlos Medina & Andrés Trejos, . "Measuring Economic and Social Impacts of Migration in Colombia: New evidence," Borradores de Economia 601, Banco de la Republica de Colombia.
  10. Cuong, Nguyen Viet & Mont, Daniel, 2011. "Does parental disability matter to child education ? evidence from Vietnam," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 5743, The World Bank.
  11. Kristina A. Schapiro, 2009. "Migration and Educational Outcomes of Children," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present), Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) HDRP-2009-57, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), revised Oct 2009.
  12. Ratha, Dilip & Mohapatra, Sanket & Scheja, Elina, 2011. "Impact of migration on economic and social development : a review of evidence and emerging issues," Policy Research Working Paper Series, The World Bank 5558, The World Bank.
  13. Ann Vogel & Kim Korinek, 2012. "Passing by the Girls? Remittance Allocation for Educational Expenditures and Social Inequality in Nepal’s Households 2003–2004," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(1), pages 61-100, 03.
  14. de Brauw, Alan & Mu, Ren, 2011. "Migration and the overweight and underweight status of children in rural China," Food Policy, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 36(1), pages 88-100, February.

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