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How responsive is body weight to transitory income changes? Evidence from rural Tanzania

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  • Bengtsson, Niklas

Abstract

We use time-series of rainfall to estimate the response of body weight to transitory changes in household income in rural Tanzania. We find that the response of body weight to income changes is positive on average, but that the impact is highest for female children, and lower for adults. For female children, a ten-percent increase in household income implies an increase in body weight by about 0.4Â kg. In contrast, the body weight of adolescents and young adults is virtually invariant to income changes.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 92 (2010)
Issue (Month): 1 (May)
Pages: 53-61

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:92:y:2010:i:1:p:53-61

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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Keywords: Income variability Nutrition Sub-Saharan Africa;

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Cited by:
  1. Gajigo, Ousman & Schwab, Benjamin, 2012. "The Rhythm of the Rains: Seasonal Effects on Child Health in The Gambia," 2012 Conference, August 18-24, 2012, Foz do Iguacu, Brazil 126343, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
  2. Ohlsson, Henry, 2009. "The legacy of the Swedish gift and inheritance tax, 1884-2004," Working Paper Series, Center for Fiscal Studies 2009:13, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.
  3. Ronald Mendoza & Nicholas Rees, 2009. "Infant Mortality During Economic Downturns and Recovery," Working papers 0904, UNICEF,Division of Policy and Strategy.
  4. Rabassa, Mariano & Skoufias, Emmanuel & Jacoby, Hanan G., 2012. "Weather and child health in rural Nigeria," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6214, The World Bank.

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