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The Effects of Vocational Rehabilitation for People with Mental Illlness

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Author Info

  • Steven Stern

    ()

  • John Pepper

    ()

  • David Dean

    ()

  • Robert Schmidt

    ()

Abstract

: The public-sector Vocational Rehabilitation (VR) program is a $3 billion federal-state partnership designed to provide employment-related assistance to persons with disabilities. There is, however, relatively little-known about the long-term efficacy of VR programs. This paper utilizes unique and detailed administrative and employment data to examine both short and longer-term employment impacts for all persons diagnosed with mental illness who applied for VR services in the state of Virginia in State Fiscal Year 2000. These data provide quarterly information on VR services and employment outcomes from 1995 to 2010. Estimates from our model of service provision and labor market outcomes reveal that VR services generally have positive long-run labor market outcome effects that appear to substantially exceed the cost of providing services.

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File URL: http://www.virginia.edu/economics/RePEc/vir/virpap/papers/virpap382.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Virginia, Department of Economics in its series Virginia Economics Online Papers with number 382.

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Length: 57 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2011
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:vir:virpap:382

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Web page: http://www.virginia.edu/economics/home.html

Related research

Keywords: etraining; mental illness; treatment effects;

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  9. Robert Shimer, 2012. "Reassessing the Ins and Outs of Unemployment," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 15(2), pages 127-148, April.
  10. Aakvik, Arild & Heckman, James J. & Vytlacil, Edward J., 2005. "Estimating treatment effects for discrete outcomes when responses to treatment vary: an application to Norwegian vocational rehabilitation programs," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 15-51.
  11. Moffitt, Robert, 1985. "Unemployment insurance and the distribution of unemployment spells," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 28(1), pages 85-101, April.
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