Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this paper or follow this series

Trade Unions and Unpaid Overtime in Britain

Contents:

Author Info

  • Michail Veliziotis

    ()
    (University of the West of England, Bristol)

Abstract

In this paper we use British Household Panel Survey data to examine the relationship between individual trade union status and unpaid overtime in Britain. The findings indicate that in the for-profit, non-caring sector of the economy, union covered employees supply fewer unpaid overtime hours than non-covered ones due to union protection and the weakening of economic incentives caused by union bargaining. On the other hand, in the non-profit, caring sector, union members offer more unpaid extra hours than covered non-members because of their specific pro-social motivations. Additional evidence is presented that confirms that union members are actually characterized by a specific pro-social ethos.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www2.uwe.ac.uk/faculties/BBS/BUS/Research/Economics13/1304.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol in its series Working Papers with number 20131304.

as in new window
Length:
Date of creation: 04 Jan 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20131304

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Frenchay Campus, Coldharbour Lane, Bristol BS16 1QY
Phone: 0117 328 3610
Web page: http://www1.uwe.ac.uk/bl/research/bristoleconomics.aspx
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

Other versions of this item:

This paper has been announced in the following NEP Reports:

References

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
as in new window
  1. Laszlo Goerke & Markus Pannenberg, 2010. "Trade Union Membership and Dismissals," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 324, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
  2. Nicolas Williams, 2004. "Seniority, Experience, and Wages in the UK," University of Cincinnati, Economics Working Papers Series, University of Cincinnati, Department of Economics 2004-06, University of Cincinnati, Department of Economics.
  3. Gregg, Paul & Grout, Paul A. & Ratcliffe, Anita & Smith, Sarah & Windmeijer, Frank, 2011. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 95(7), pages 758-766.
  4. Mundlak, Yair, 1978. "On the Pooling of Time Series and Cross Section Data," Econometrica, Econometric Society, Econometric Society, vol. 46(1), pages 69-85, January.
  5. Trejo, Stephen J, 1993. "Overtime Pay, Overtime Hours, and Labor Unions," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 11(2), pages 253-78, April.
  6. repec:ese:iserwp:2010-43 is not listed on IDEAS
  7. Adriaan S. Kalwij & Mary Gregory, 2005. "A panel data analysis of the effects of wages, standard hours and unionization on paid overtime work in Britain," Journal of the Royal Statistical Society Series A, Royal Statistical Society, Royal Statistical Society, vol. 168(1), pages 207-231.
  8. Alexandros Zangelidis, 2004. "Seniority Profiles In Unionised Workplaces: Do Unions Still Have The Edge?," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004, Royal Economic Society 48, Royal Economic Society.
  9. Chamberlain, Gary, 1982. "Multivariate regression models for panel data," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 5-46, January.
  10. Andy Charlwood, 2002. "Why Do Non-union Employees Want to Unionize? Evidence from Britain," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, London School of Economics, vol. 40(3), pages 463-491, 09.
  11. David Metcalf & Kirstine Hansen & Andy Charlwood, 2001. "Unions and the Sword of Justice: Unions and Pay Systems, Pay Inequality, Pay Discrimination and Low Pay," National Institute Economic Review, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, National Institute of Economic and Social Research, vol. 176(1), pages 61-75, April.
  12. Michail Veliziotis, 2013. "Trade Unions and Unpaid Overtime in Britain," Working Papers, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol 20131304, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.
  13. Daniele Checchi & Jelle Visser & Herman G. van de Werfhorst, 2010. "Inequality and Union Membership: The Influence of Relative Earnings and Inequality Attitudes," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, London School of Economics, vol. 48(1), pages 84-108, 03.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Michail Veliziotis, 2013. "Trade Unions and Unpaid Overtime in Britain," Working Papers, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol 20131304, Department of Accounting, Economics and Finance, Bristol Business School, University of the West of England, Bristol.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwe:wpaper:20131304. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Felix Ritchie).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.