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Age-dependent effects of socio-economic background on educational attainment - evidence from Germany

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  • W.H.J. Hassink
  • H. Kiiver
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    Abstract

    The impact of socio-economic background on a child's educational attainment has been discussed as a static concept so far. Existing economic literature as well as the psychology of education literature point however towards a dynamic process where the impact of socio-economic background depends on the age of the child. We explore this possibility using German micro-data. Using instrumental variable methods we estimate the causal effects of parental education and household income on school success of a child at two points in time of his school career. The estimates indicate that household income has a more important effect on the educational success of children in a more advanced point during the education while the effect of parental education seems to be stable.

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    File URL: http://dspace.library.uu.nl/bitstream/handle/1874/31475/07-26.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Utrecht School of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 07-26.

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    Length: 35 pages
    Date of creation: 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:use:tkiwps:0726

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    Related research

    Keywords: school choice; demand for schooling; human capital;

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    1. repec:ese:iserwp:2005-22 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Marco Francesconi & Stephen P. Jenkins & Thomas Siedler, 2006. "Childhood Family Structure and Schooling Outcomes: Evidence for Germany," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 610, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    3. Chevalier, Arnaud, 2004. "Parental Education and Child's Education: A Natural Experiment," IZA Discussion Papers 1153, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Checchi, Daniele & Flabbi, Luca, 2007. "Intergenerational Mobility and Schooling Decisions in Germany and Italy: The Impact of Secondary School Tracks," IZA Discussion Papers 2876, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Pedro Carneiro & James J. Heckman, 2002. "The Evidence on Credit Constraints in Post-Secondary Schooling," NBER Working Papers 9055, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Christian Dustmann, 2004. "Parental background, secondary school track choice, and wages," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 209-230, April.
    7. repec:ese:iserwp:2002-20 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Daron Acemoglu & Jorn-Steffen Pischke, 2001. "Changes in the wage structure, family income, and children's education," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 2471, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    9. Sandra E. Black & Paul J. Devereux & Kjell G. Salvanes, 2003. "Why the apple doesn't fall far: understanding intergenerational transmission of human capital," CeMMAP working papers CWP16/03, Centre for Microdata Methods and Practice, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    10. Philippe Mahler & Rainer Winkelmann, 2005. "Single Motherhood and (Un)Equal EducationalOpportunities: Evidence for Germany," SOI - Working Papers 0512, Socioeconomic Institute - University of Zurich.
    11. Steedman, Hilary, 1993. "The Economics of Youth Training in Germany," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(420), pages 1279-91, September.
    12. Chevalier, Arnaud & Harmon, Colm P. & O'Sullivan, Vincent & Walker, Ian, 2005. "The Impact of Parental Income and Education on the Schooling of Their Children," IZA Discussion Papers 1496, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    13. J.D. Angrist & Guido W. Imbens & D.B. Rubin, 1993. "Identification of Causal Effects Using Instrumental Variables," NBER Technical Working Papers 0136, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    14. Jenkins, Stephen P. & Schluter, Christian, 2002. "The Effect of Family Income During Childhood on Later-Life Attainment: Evidence from Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 604, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    15. Sascha BECKER & Frank SIEBERN-THOMAS, 2001. "Returns to Education in Germany: A Variable Treatment Intensity Approach," Economics Working Papers ECO2001/09, European University Institute.
    16. Philip Oreopoulos & Marianne E. Page & Ann Huff Stevens, 2003. "Does Human Capital Transfer from Parent to Child? The Intergenerational Effects of Compulsory Schooling," NBER Working Papers 10164, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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