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Capital Management Techniques In Developing Countries: An Assessment of Experiences From the 1990s and Lessons for the Future

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  • K.S. Jomo
  • Ilene Grabel
  • Gerald Epstein
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    Abstract

    The Ghana Poverty Reduction Strategy (GPRS) is currently Ghana's blueprint for growth, poverty reduction, and human development. It represents the framework the government of Ghana adopted to foster economic growth and fight poverty. A joint ILO/UNDP team was set up to specifically study the employment initiatives, programs, and projects that the government of Ghana is currently pursuing within the context of the GPRS. This report examines the current content of the GPRS with regard to employment; identifies challenges for realizing employment objectives; and develops recommendations for strengthening the employment content of national policies. In doing so, it outlines the elements of an employment framework for poverty-reducing growth in Ghana.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst in its series Working Papers with number wp56.

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    Date of creation: 2003
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:uma:periwp:wp56

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