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Skills required for innovation: A review of the literature

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  • Pierre Therrien

    ()
    (Industrie Canada, Ottawa)

  • Petr Hanel

    ()
    (CIRST, GREDI, Faculte d'administration, Université de Sherbrooke)

Abstract

Research teams from 18 OECD countries used the methodology introduced by Crepon-Dugay and Mairesse (CDM) to analyze the impact of innovation on labour productivity using firm data from national innovation and administrative surveys. To ensure international comparability, the OECD ‘core’ CDM model did not include variables for which data were missing in some countries. In spite of this shortcoming, the results are broadly in line with theoretical hypotheses and previous studies and show a surprising degree of similarity between countries. This paper builds on the Canadian application of the ‘core’ model used for the OECD project. It uses to the full extent all information available on manufacturing establishments from the Canadian Survey of innovation 2005 linked with the Annual Survey of Manufactures and Logging (ASML). The estimated econometric model controls for selection bias, simultaneity, size of firm and industry effects. The main findings suggest that (1) export outside of the US market, size of the firm and use of direct or indirect government support are factors increasing the probability to innovate and having positive innovation sales. (2) Exports (both to the US and outside of the US market), cooperation with other firms and organizations, and high share of the firms’ revenue coming from sales to its most important client are all factors correlated with higher innovation expenditures per employees. Moreover, firms with a higher market share at the beginning of the period are spending more on innovation by the end of the period. (3) Firms with higher innovation expenditures per employee generate more innovation sales per employee. Other factors increasing innovation sales are human and physical capital and introduction of process innovations. (4) Finally, the firms generating more innovation sales per employees achieve higher labour productivity, even when the size of firms, the intensity of human and physical capital and labour productivity at the beginning are taken into account. The results add valuable further information to and are in line with the simpler model applied to 18 other OECD countries. The paper concludes with discussion of policy implications.

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File URL: http://gredi.recherche.usherbrooke.ca/wpapers/GREDI-0916.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Departement d'Economique de la Faculte d'administration à l'Universite de Sherbrooke in its series Cahiers de recherche with number 09-16.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: 01 Sep 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:shr:wpaper:09-16

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Keywords: Innovation; skills; national innovation systems; labour market; education of innovation; effect of innovation on skills;

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References

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  1. Gu, Wulong & Baldwin, John R., 2004. "Innovation, Survival and Performance of Canadian Manufacturing Plants," Economic Analysis (EA) Research Paper Series 2004022e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.
  2. Jean-Philippe Cotis, 2006. "Benchmarking Canada's Economic Performance," International Productivity Monitor, Centre for the Study of Living Standards, vol. 13, pages 3-20, Fall.
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  5. Hans Loof & Almas Heshmati, 2006. "On the relationship between innovation and performance: A sensitivity analysis," Economics of Innovation and New Technology, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 15(4-5), pages 317-344.
  6. Petr Hanel, 2004. "Innovation in the Canadian Service Sector," Cahiers de recherche 04-03, Departement d'Economique de la Faculte d'administration à l'Universite de Sherbrooke.
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  9. John Baldwin & Wulong Gu, 2003. "Export-market participation and productivity performance in Canadian manufacturing," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 36(3), pages 634-657, August.
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  16. Baldwin, John R. & Johnson, Joanne, 1996. "Business strategies in more- and less-innovative firms in Canada," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 25(5), pages 785-804, August.
  17. De Loecker, Jan, 2007. "Do exports generate higher productivity? Evidence from Slovenia," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 73(1), pages 69-98, September.
  18. Baldwin, John R., 1998. "Failing Concerns: Business Bankruptcy in Canada," Failing Concerns: Business Bankruptcy in Canada, Statistics Canada, Economic Analysis, number stcb1e, December.
  19. Rachel Griffith & Elena Huergo & Jacques Mairesse & Bettina Peters, 2006. "Innovation and Productivity Across Four European Countries," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 22(4), pages 483-498, Winter.
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Cited by:
  1. Meng, Rüdiger, 2009. "Standort und Innovation - Innovationsaktivitäten und Forschungskooperationen von Unternehmen aus regionaler Perspektive," Arbeitsmaterial der ARL: Aufsätze, in: Innovationen im Raum - Raum für Innovationen: 11. Junges Forum der ARL, 21. bis 23. Mai 2008 in Berlin, pages 40-52 Akademie für Raumforschung und Landesplanung (ARL) - Leibniz-Forum für Raumwissenschaften.

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