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The Eonomic Impact Of More Sustainable Water Use In Agriculture: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis

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  • Alvaro Calzadilla
  • Katrin Rehdanz
  • Richard S.J. Tol

    ()
    (Economic and Social Research Institute)

Abstract

Water problems are typically studied at the farm-level, the river–catchment-level or the country-level. About 70% of irrigation water is used for agriculture, and agricultural products are traded internationally. A full understanding of water use is impossible without understanding the international market for food and related products, such as textiles. Based on the global general equilibrium model GTAP-W, we offer a method for investigating the role of green (rain) and blue (irrigation) water resources in agriculture and within the context of international trade. Since problems related to groundwater availability are getting more severe in the future, we analyze the impact of different water use options for 2025 where data is readily available. We run two alternative scenarios. The first, called water crisis scenario, explores a deterioration of current trends and policies in the water sector. The second scenario, called sustainable water use scenario, assumes an improvement in policies and trends in the water sector and eliminates groundwater overdraft worldwide, increasing water allocation for the environment. In both scenarios, welfare gains or losses are not only associated with changes in agricultural water consumption. Under the water crisis scenario, welfare not only rises for regions where water consumption increases (China, South East Asia and the USA). Welfare gains are considerable for Japan and South Korea, Southeast Asia and Western Europe as well. These regions benefit from higher irrigated production and lower food prices. Alternatively, under the sustainable water use scenario, welfare losses not only affect regions where overdrafting is occurring. Welfare decreases in other regions as well. These results indicate that, for water use, there is a clear trade-off between economic welfare and environmental sustainability.

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File URL: http://www.fnu.zmaw.de/fileadmin/fnu-files/publication/working-papers/CGEirrigationWP.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University in its series Working Papers with number FNU-169.

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Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2008
Date of revision: Dec 2008
Handle: RePEc:sgc:wpaper:169

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Keywords: Agricultural Water Use; Computable General Equilibrium; Groundwater Use; Irrigation; Sustainable Water Use; Water Scarcity;

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References

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  1. Pereira, Luis Santos & Oweis, Theib & Zairi, Abdelaziz, 2002. "Irrigation management under water scarcity," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 57(3), pages 175-206, December.
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  10. Rehdanz, Katrin & Berrittella, Maria & S.J. Tol, Richard & Zhang, Jian, 2008. "The Impact of Trade Liberalization on Water Use: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Journal of Economic Integration, Center for Economic Integration, Sejong University, vol. 23, pages 631-655.
  11. Diao, Xinshen & Roe, Terry, 2003. "Can a water market avert the "double-whammy" of trade reform and lead to a "win-win" outcome?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 708-723, May.
  12. Maria Berrittella & Katrin Rehdanz & Roberto Roson & Richard S.J. Tol, 2006. "The Economic Impact Of Water Pricing: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers FNU-96, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jan 2006.
  13. Maria Berrittella & Katrin Rehdanz & Arjen Y. Hoekstra & Roberto Roson & Richard S.J. Tol, 2006. "The Economic Impact Of Restricted Water Supply: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers FNU-93, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Jul 2006.
  14. Burniaux, Jean-Marc & Truong Truong, 2002. "GTAP-E: An Energy-Environmental Version of the GTAP Model," GTAP Technical Papers 923, Center for Global Trade Analysis, Department of Agricultural Economics, Purdue University.
  15. Anthony Letsoalo & James Blignaut & Theuns de Wet & Martin de Wit & Sebastiaan Hess & Richard S.J. Tol & Jan van Heerden, 2005. "Triple Dividends Of Water Consumption Charges In South Africa," Working Papers FNU-62, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Apr 2005.
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  17. van Heerden, Jan H. & Blignaut, James & Horridge, Mark, 2008. "Integrated water and economic modelling of the impacts of water market instruments on the South African economy," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 105-116, May.
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  19. Scott McDonald & Sherman Robinson & Karen Thierfelder, 2007. "Globe: A SAM Based Global CGE Model using GTAP Data," Departmental Working Papers 14, United States Naval Academy Department of Economics.
  20. Lilienfeld, Amy & Asmild, Mette, 2007. "Estimation of excess water use in irrigated agriculture: A Data Envelopment Analysis approach," Agricultural Water Management, Elsevier, vol. 94(1-3), pages 73-82, December.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Nicholas Rivers & Steven Groves, 2013. "The Welfare Impact of Self-supplied Water Pricing in Canada: A Computable General Equilibrium Assessment," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(3), pages 419-445, July.
  2. Alvaro Calzadilla & Katrin Rehdanz & Richard Betts & Pete Falloon & Andy Wiltshire & Richard S.J. Tol, 2010. "Climate Change Impacts on Global Agriculture," Working Papers FNU-185, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Apr 2010.
  3. Bosello, Francesco & Eboli, Fabio & Parrado, Ramiro & Nunes, Paulo A.L.D. & Ding, Helen & Rosa, Renato, 2011. "The economic assessment of changes in ecosystem services: and application of the CGE methodology," Economia Agraria y Recursos Naturales, Spanish Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 11(1).
  4. Carlo Orecchia & Ramiro Parrado, 2013. "A Quantitative Assessment of the Implications of Including non-CO2 Emissions in the European ETS," Working Papers 2013.100, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.

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