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Integrated water and economic modelling of the impacts of water market instruments on the South African economy

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  • van Heerden, Jan H.
  • Blignaut, James
  • Horridge, Mark

Abstract

A static computable general equilibrium model of South Africa is adapted to compare new taxes on water demand by two industries, namely forestry, and irrigated field crops. Comparisons are made with respect to both the short and the long run, in terms of three target variables, namely (i) the environment; (ii) the economy; and (iii) equity. Since the taxes on the two industries do not raise the same amount of revenue, the target variables are calculated per unit of real government revenue raised by the new taxes (also referred to as the marginal excess burdens of the taxes). The model results are robust for moderate values of the water elasticity of demand in the two industries, in both the long and the short run. The tax on irrigated field crops performs better in terms of all three the target variables in the short run. In the long run the tax on irrigated filed crops is better in terms of water saving, but reduces real GDP and the consumption by poor households.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Ecological Economics.

Volume (Year): 66 (2008)
Issue (Month): 1 (May)
Pages: 105-116

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Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolec:v:66:y:2008:i:1:p:105-116

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Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolecon

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  1. Roe, Terry & Dinar, Ariel & Tsur, Yacov & Diao, Xinshen, 2005. "Feedback links between economy-wide and farm-level policies: With application to irrigation water management in Morocco," Journal of Policy Modeling, Elsevier, vol. 27(8), pages 905-928, November.
  2. Cai, Ximing & McKinney, Daene C. & Rosegrant, Mark W., 2003. "Sustainability analysis for irrigation water management in the Aral Sea region," Agricultural Systems, Elsevier, vol. 76(3), pages 1043-1066, June.
  3. Rosegrant, M.W. & Ringler, C. & McKinney, D.C. & Cai, X. & Keller, A. & Donoso, G., 2000. "Integrated economic-hydrologic water modeling at the basin scale: the Maipo river basin," Agricultural Economics: The Journal of the International Association of Agricultural Economists, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 24(1), December.
  4. Jan van Heerden & Reyer Gerlagh & James Blignaut & Mark Horridge & Sebastiaan Hess & Ramos Mabugu & Margaret Mabugu, 2006. "Searching for Triple Dividends in South Africa: Fighting CO2 Pollution and Poverty while Promoting Growth," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 113-142.
  5. Diao, Xinshen & Roe, Terry, 2003. "Can a water market avert the "double-whammy" of trade reform and lead to a "win-win" outcome?," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 45(3), pages 708-723, May.
  6. Steven Renzetti, 1992. "Estimating the Structure of Industrial Water Demands: The Case of Canadian Manufacturing," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 68(4), pages 396-404.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Glyn Wittwer, 2012. "Accelerated water savings and demand growth for farm outputs: impacts on the economy of the southern Murray-Darling Basin," Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre Working Papers g-232, Victoria University, Centre of Policy Studies/IMPACT Centre.
  2. James Blignaut & Jan van Heerden, 2009. "Is Water Shedding Next?," Working Papers 141, Economic Research Southern Africa.
  3. Nicholas Rivers & Steven Groves, 2013. "The Welfare Impact of Self-supplied Water Pricing in Canada: A Computable General Equilibrium Assessment," Environmental & Resource Economics, European Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 55(3), pages 419-445, July.
  4. Alvaro Calzadilla & Katrin Rehdanz & Richard S.J. Tol, 2008. "Water Scarcity And The Impact Of Improved Irrigation Management: A Cge Analysis," Working Papers FNU-160, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Apr 2008.
  5. Dinar, Ariel, 2012. "Economy-wide implications of direct and indirect policy interventions in the water sector: lessons from recent work and future research needs," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6068, The World Bank.
  6. Gill, Tania & Punt, Cecilia, 2010. "The Potential Impact of Increased Irrigation Water Tariffs in South Africa," 2010 AAAE Third Conference/AEASA 48th Conference, September 19-23, 2010, Cape Town, South Africa 96425, African Association of Agricultural Economists (AAAE) & Agricultural Economics Association of South Africa (AEASA).
  7. Brouwer, Roy & Hofkes, Marjan, 2008. "Integrated hydro-economic modelling: Approaches, key issues and future research directions," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 16-22, May.
  8. Alvaro Calzadilla & Katrin Rehdanz & Richard S.J. Tol, 2008. "The Eonomic Impact Of More Sustainable Water Use In Agriculture: A Computable General Equilibrium Analysis," Working Papers FNU-169, Research unit Sustainability and Global Change, Hamburg University, revised Dec 2008.

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