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Employment-At-Will Exceptions and Jobless Recovery

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  • DeNicco, James

    ()
    (Drexel University)

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    Abstract

    In this paper I study the effects on jobless recovery of diminishing the power of an employer to fire an employee through Employment-At-Will Exceptions (EWEs). I do so by using a dynamic panel with quarterly data ranging from 1976 to 2010 for the 50 states in the United States. I test both changes in state unemployment rates and state-weighted GDP growth in single variable regressions and VAR regressions. My contribution to the literature is threefold. First, I show two of the three EWEs contribute significantly to jobless recovery in the U.S. The statistical tests in this paper show that Implied Contract Exceptions slow decreases in the unemployment rate during recovery from recession by between 0.025 and 0.033 percentage points per quarter, and Covenant of Good Faith and Fair Dealing Exceptions do so by between 0.039 and 0.055 percentage points per quarter. Second, I lend support to the predictions of theory that increased firing costs decrease the rate of hiring during recoveries. Third, I resolve differences in the various sources documenting the three types of EWEs in different states.

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    File URL: http://dl.dropboxusercontent.com/u/162210677/RePEc/drx/wpaper/LeBow%20College%20of%20Business%20Working%20Paper%202013-1.pdf
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by LeBow College of Business, Drexel University in its series School of Economics Working Paper Series with number 2013-1.

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    Length: 40 pages
    Date of creation: 29 Jul 2013
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ris:drxlwp:2013_001

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    Web page: http://www.lebow.drexel.edu/
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    Keywords: Employment at will; jobless recovery;

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    1. Daniel Aaronson & Ellen Rissman & Daniel G. Sullivan, 2004. "Can sectoral reallocation explain the jobless recovery?," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 36-39.
    2. Mortensen, Dale T. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 1999. "New developments in models of search in the labor market," Handbook of Labor Economics, in: O. Ashenfelter & D. Card (ed.), Handbook of Labor Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 39, pages 2567-2627 Elsevier.
    3. Perron, P, 1988. "The Great Crash, The Oil Price Shock And The Unit Root Hypothesis," Papers 338, Princeton, Department of Economics - Econometric Research Program.
    4. David H. Autor & William R. Kerr & Adriana D. Kugler, 2007. "Does Employment Protection Reduce Productivity? Evidence From US States," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 117(521), pages 189-217, 06.
    5. Shigeru Fujita & Garey Ramey, 2007. "The cyclicality of separation and job finding rates," Working Papers 07-19, Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia.
    6. M Arellano & O Bover, 1990. "Another Look at the Instrumental Variable Estimation of Error-Components Models," CEP Discussion Papers dp0007, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    7. Miles, Thomas J, 2000. "Common Law Exceptions to Employment at Will and U.S. Labor Markets," Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 16(1), pages 74-101, April.
    8. Erica L. Groshen & Simon Potter, 2003. "Has structural change contributed to a jobless recovery?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 9(Aug).
    9. Frédéric GAVREL & Isabelle LEBON, 2008. "Firing Costs, Payroll Taxes and Unemployement," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 89, pages 121-129.
    10. Dale T. Mortensen & Christopher A. Pissarides, 1993. "Job Creation and Job Destruction in the Theory of Unemployment," CEP Discussion Papers dp0110, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    11. Daniel Aaronson & Ellen Rissman & Daniel G. Sullivan, 2004. "Assessing the jobless recovery," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q II, pages 2-21.
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