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Factor Demand Linkages, Technology Shocks and the Business Cycle

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  • Holly, Sean
  • Petrella, Ivan

Abstract

This paper argues that factor demand linkages are crucial in the transmission of both sectoral and aggregate shocks. We show this using a panel of highly disaggregated manufacturing sectors together with sectoral structural VARs. When sectoral interactions are explicitly accounted for, a contemporaneous technology shock to all manufacturing sectors implies a positive response in both output and hours at the aggregate level. Otherwise, there is a negative correlation as in much of the existing literature. Furthermore, we find that technology shocks are important drivers of business cycles.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 18120.

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Date of creation: Sep 2009
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:18120

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Keywords: Multisectors; Technology shocks; Business cycles; Long-run restrictions; Cross Sectional Dependence.;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Martín Saldías, 2011. "A Market-based Approach to Sector Risk Determinants and Transmission in the Euro Area," Working Papers w201130, Banco de Portugal, Economics and Research Department.
  2. Natalia Bailey & Sean Holly & M. Hashem Pesaran, 2014. "A Two Stage Approach to Spatiotemporal Analysis with Strong and Weak Cross-Sectional Dependence," CESifo Working Paper Series 4592, CESifo Group Munich.
  3. Chudik, Alexander & Pesaran, M. Hashem, 2014. "Theory and practice of GVAR modeling," Globalization and Monetary Policy Institute Working Paper 180, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
  4. Cantore, Cristiano & León-Ledesma, Miguel A. & McAdam, Peter & Willman, Alpo, 2010. "Shocking stuff: technology, hours, and factor substitution," Working Paper Series 1278, European Central Bank.
  5. Peng, Ling & Hong, Yongmiao, 2013. "Productivity spillovers among linked sectors," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(C), pages 44-61.
  6. Yongsung Chang & Sunoong Hwang, 2011. "Asymmetric Phase Shifts in the U.S. Industrial Production Cycles," RCER Working Papers 564, University of Rochester - Center for Economic Research (RCER).

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