Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

How Important is the Intermediate Input Channel in Explaining Sectoral Employment Comovement over the Business Cycle?

Contents:

Author Info

  • Young Sik Kim

    (Seoul National University)

  • Kunhong Kim
Registered author(s):

    Abstract

    This paper investigates both analytically and quantitatively the role of intersectoral linkages in explaining sectoral employment comovement over the business cycle. We use a multisector dynamic stochastic general equilibrium model calibrated to the 2-digit SIC level intermediate input-use and capital-use tables and sectoral productivity shocks. With indivisible labor implying constant marginal utility of leisure, intersectoral linkages at the disaggregated level generate strong employment comovement across sectors. With divisible labor, however, procyclical marginal utility of leisure can dominate intersectoral linkages, implying some negative comovement. It further requires some form of the difficulty in reallocating labor across sectors, so that the substitutability of labor supply across sectors is relatively low. With divisible labor, a limited substitution of labor hours across sectors is shown to generate strong employment comovement over the business cycle. (Copyright: Elsevier)

    Download Info

    If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.red.2006.06.002
    Download Restriction: Access to full texts is restricted to ScienceDirect subscribers and institutional members. See http://www.sciencedirect.com/ for details.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

    Bibliographic Info

    Article provided by Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics in its journal Review of Economic Dynamics.

    Volume (Year): 9 (2006)
    Issue (Month): 4 (October)
    Pages: 659-682

    as in new window
    Handle: RePEc:red:issued:04-11

    Contact details of provider:
    Postal: Review of Economic Dynamics Academic Press Editorial Office 525 "B" Street, Suite 1900 San Diego, CA 92101
    Fax: 1-314-444-8731
    Email:
    Web page: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/review.htm
    More information through EDIRC

    Order Information:
    Email:
    Web: http://www.EconomicDynamics.org/RED17.htm

    Related research

    Keywords:

    References

    References listed on IDEAS
    Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:
    as in new window
    1. Horvath, Michael, 2000. "Sectoral shocks and aggregate fluctuations," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1), pages 69-106, February.
    2. Backus, David K & Kehoe, Patrick J, 1992. "International Evidence of the Historical Properties of Business Cycles," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 82(4), pages 864-88, September.
    3. Andreas Hornstein, 2000. "The business cycle and industry comovement," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Win, pages 27-48.
    4. Hansen, Gary D., 1985. "Indivisible labor and the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 309-327, November.
    5. Mark Bils & Kenneth J. McLaughlin, 1992. "Inter-Industry Mobility and the Cyclical Upgrading of Labor," NBER Working Papers 4130, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Lawrence J. Christiano & Michele Boldrin & Jonas D. M. Fisher, 2001. "Habit Persistence, Asset Returns, and the Business Cycle," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 91(1), pages 149-166, March.
    7. Kevin M. Murphy & Andrei Shleifer & Robert W. Vishny, 1989. "Building Blocks of Market Clearing Business Cycle Models," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1989, Volume 4, pages 247-302 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Lawrence J. Christiano & Jonas D. M. Fisher, 2003. "Stock Market and Investment Goods Prices: Implications for Macroeconomics," NBER Working Papers 10031, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    9. Lawrence J. Cristiano & Terry J. Fitzgerald, 1998. "The business cycle: it's still a puzzle," Economic Perspectives, Federal Reserve Bank of Chicago, issue Q IV, pages 56-83.
    10. Geary, Patrick T & Kennan, John, 1982. "The Employment-Real Wage Relationship: An International Study," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 90(4), pages 854-71, August.
    11. Finn Kydland & Edward C. Prescott, 1980. "A Competitive Theory of Fluctuations and the Feasibility and Desirability of Stabilization Policy," NBER Chapters, in: Rational Expectations and Economic Policy, pages 169-198 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    12. Benhabib, Jess & Rogerson, Richard & Wright, Randall, 1991. "Homework in Macroeconomics: Household Production and Aggregate Fluctuations," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 99(6), pages 1166-87, December.
    13. Dale W. Jorgenson & Kevin J. Stiroh, 2000. "Raising the Speed Limit: US Economic Growth in the Information Age," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 261, OECD Publishing.
    14. Hornstein, Andreas & Praschnik, Jack, 1997. "Intermediate inputs and sectoral comovement in the business cycle," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 573-595, December.
    15. Andreas Hornstein, 1998. "Inventory investment and the business cycle," Economic Quarterly, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond, issue Spr, pages 49-71.
    16. Gregory W. Huffman & Mark A. Wynne, 1995. "The role of intratemporal adjustment costs in a multi-sector economy," Working Papers 9508, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    17. Long, John B, Jr & Plosser, Charles I, 1983. "Real Business Cycles," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 91(1), pages 39-69, February.
    18. repec:fth:harver:1487 is not listed on IDEAS
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as in new window

    Cited by:
    1. Holly, Sean & Petrella, Ivan, 2009. "Factor Demand Linkages, Technology Shocks and the Business Cycle," MPRA Paper 18120, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Olivier Cardi & Romain Restout, 2013. "Imperfect Mobility Of Labor Across Sectors: A Reappraisal Of The Balassa-Samuelson Effect," Working Papers of BETA 2013-04, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    3. Petrella, Ivan & Santoro, Emiliano, 2010. "Optimal Monetary Policy with Durable Consumption Goods and Factor Demand Linkages," MPRA Paper 21321, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    4. Sunoong Hwang & Yongsung Chang, 2011. "Asymmetric Phase Shifts in U.S. Industrial Production Cycles," 2011 Meeting Papers 31, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    5. Yazid Dissou & Lilia Karnizova, 2012. "Emissions Cap or Emissions Tax? A Multi-sector Business Cycle Analysis," Working Papers 1210E, University of Ottawa, Department of Economics.
    6. Sean Holly & Ivan Petrella, . " Factor demand linkages and the business cycle: interpreting aggregate fluctuations as sectoral fluctuations," CDMA Conference Paper Series 0809, Centre for Dynamic Macroeconomic Analysis.
    7. Emilio Fernández Corugedo & Esther Pérez Ruiz, 2014. "The EU Services Directive: Gains from Further Liberalization," IMF Working Papers 14/113, International Monetary Fund.

    Lists

    This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:red:issued:04-11. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Christian Zimmermann).

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

    If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.