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Positive externalities of congestion, human capital, and socio-economic factors: A case study of chronic illness in Japan

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  • yamamura, eiji

Abstract

This paper explores, using Japanese panel data for the years 1988-2002, how externalities from congestion and human capital influence deaths caused by chronic illnesses. Major findings through fixed effects 2SLS estimation were as follows: (1) the number of deaths were smaller in more densely-populated areas, and this tendency was more distinct for males; (2) higher human capital correlated with a decreased number of deaths, with the effect being greater in females than in males. These findings suggest that human capital and positive externalities stemming from congestion make a contribution to improving lifestyle, which is affected differently by socio-economic circumstance in males and females.

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Paper provided by University Library of Munich, Germany in its series MPRA Paper with number 10833.

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Date of creation: 29 Sep 2008
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Handle: RePEc:pra:mprapa:10833

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Keywords: population density; education; chronic illness;

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  1. Costa-Font, Joan & Gil, Joan, 2005. "Obesity and the incidence of chronic diseases in Spain: A seemingly unrelated probit approach," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 188-214, July.
  2. Chou, Shin-Yi & Grossman, Michael & Saffer, Henry, 2004. "An economic analysis of adult obesity: results from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 565-587, May.
  3. Antonio Ciccone & Robert E. Hall, 1993. "Productivity and the Density of Economic Activity," NBER Working Papers 4313, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. David M. Cutler & Edward L. Glaeser & Jesse M. Shapiro, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese?," Harvard Institute of Economic Research Working Papers, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research 1994, Harvard - Institute of Economic Research.
  5. Shapiro, Jesse & Glaeser, Edward & Cutler, David, 2003. "Why Have Americans Become More Obese," Scholarly Articles 2640583, Harvard University Department of Economics.
  6. Cooper, D. & McCausland, W.D. & Theodossiou, I., 2006. "The health hazards of unemployment and poor education: The socioeconomic determinants of health duration in the European Union," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 4(3), pages 273-297, December.
  7. Handa, Sudhanshu, 1998. "Gender and life-cycle differences in the impact of schooling on chronic disease in Jamaica," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 325-336, June.
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