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Food miles: Starving the poor?

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  • John Ballingall

    ()
    (New Zealand Institute of Economic Research)

  • Niven Winchester

    ()
    (Department of Economics, University of Otago)

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    Abstract

    Food miles measure the distance food travels to reach consumers' plates. Although substituting local food for imported produce will not necessarily reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions, the food miles movement is widely supported by consumers and import-competing producers. We investigate the economic implications of food miles-induced preference changes in Europe using an economy-wide model. We observe large welfare losses for several Sub-Saharan African nations. We conclude that food miles campaigns will increase global inequality without necessarily improving environmental outcomes. Length: 30 pages

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    File URL: http://www.business.otago.ac.nz/econ/research/discussionpapers/DP_0812.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2008
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by University of Otago, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 0812.

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    Date of creation: Dec 2008
    Date of revision: Dec 2008
    Handle: RePEc:otg:wpaper:0812

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    Related research

    Keywords: food miles; non-tariff barriers; trade protection;

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    References

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    1. Thomas Hertel & David Hummels & Maros Ivanic & Roman Keeney, 2004. "How Confident Can We Be in CGE-Based Assessments of Free Trade Agreements?," NBER Working Papers 10477, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Niven Winchester, 2006. "Liberating middle earth: How will changes in the global trading system affect New Zealand?," New Zealand Economic Papers, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 45-79.
    3. Francois Joseph F & Wignaraja Ganeshan, 2008. "Economic Implications of Asian Integration," Global Economy Journal, De Gruyter, vol. 8(3), pages 1-48, September.
    4. Francois, Joseph & Wignaraja, Ganeshan, 2008. "Economic Implications of Deeper Asian Integration," CEPR Discussion Papers 6976, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    5. Pretty, J.N. & Ball, A.S. & Lang, T. & Morison, J.I.L., 2005. "Farm costs and food miles: An assessment of the full cost of the UK weekly food basket," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 30(1), pages 1-19, February.
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