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Evolving Discretionary Practices of U.S Antidumping Activity

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  • Bruce A. Blonigen

Abstract

Previous literature has discussed the procedural biases that exist in U.S. Department of Commerce (USDOC) dumping margin calculations. This paper examines the evolution of discretionary practices and their role in the rapid increase in average USDOC dumping margins since 1980. Statistical analysis finds that USDOC discretionary practices have played the major role in rising dumping margins. Importantly, the evolving effect of discretionary practices is due not only to increasing use of these practices over time, but apparent changes in implementation of these practices that mean a higher increase in the dumping margin whenever they are applied. While legal changes due to the Uruguay Round are estimated to have reduced the baseline U.S. dumping margin by 20 percentage points, the increasingly punitive discretionary measures used by the USDOC almost completely compensated for this decrease by 2000.

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Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 9625.

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Date of creation: Apr 2003
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Publication status: published as Blonigen, Bruce A. “Evolving Discretionary Practices of U.S. Antidumping Activity.” Canadian Journal of Economics 39 (August 2006): 874-900.
Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:9625

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  1. Wendy L. Hansen & Thomas J. Prusa, 1996. "Cumulation and ITC Decision-Making: The Sum of the Parts is Greater Than the Whole," Departmental Working Papers 199422, Rutgers University, Department of Economics.
  2. Thomas J. Prusa, 1999. "On the Spread and Impact of Antidumping," NBER Working Papers 7404, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Benjamin Liebman, 2004. "ITC voting behavior on sunset reviews," Review of World Economics (Weltwirtschaftliches Archiv), Springer, vol. 140(3), pages 446-475, September.
  4. Douglas A. Irwin, 2003. "Causing Problems? The WTO Review of Causation and Injury Attribution in U.S. Section 201 Cases," NBER Working Papers 9815, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  5. Moore, Michael O., 2005. ""Facts available" dumping allegations: when will foreign firms cooperate in antidumping petitions?," European Journal of Political Economy, Elsevier, vol. 21(1), pages 185-204, March.
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