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Industry Dynamics with Adjustment Costs

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  • Robert E. Hall

Abstract

Adjustment costs determine the dynamics of the response of an industry's output to a shift in demand. Absent any adjustment costs, an increase in demand not accompanied by any change in factor prices raises output, labor, capital, and materials in the same proportion. In the presence of adjustment costs, the elasticity of the response of factors with higher costs is less than one while the elasticity of those without adjustment costs exceeds one. I develop a model of industry dynamics to capture these properties and a related econometric framework to infer adjustment costs from the observed ratios of factor responses to output responses. I find relatively precise evidence of moderate adjustment costs.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc in its series NBER Working Papers with number 8849.

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Date of creation: Mar 2002
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Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:8849

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Cited by:
  1. Karp, Larry & Paul, Thierry, 2007. "Indeterminacy with environmental and labor dynamics," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 18(1), pages 100-119, March.
  2. Kuralbayeva, Karlygash, 2011. "Inflation persistence and exchange rate regime: Implications for dynamic adjustment to shocks in a small open economy," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 193-205, June.
  3. Jean Boivin & Marc Giannoni, 2002. "Has monetary policy become less powerful?," Staff Reports 144, Federal Reserve Bank of New York.
  4. Karlygash Kuralbayeva & David Vines, 2008. "Shocks to Terms of Trade and Risk-premium in an Intertemporal Model: The Dutch Disease and a Dutch Party," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 19(3), pages 277-303, July.
  5. Matthew D. Shapiro & Christopher L. House, 2006. "Phased-In Tax Cuts and Economic Activity," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 96(5), pages 1835-1849, December.
  6. Philippon, Thomas, 2006. "Corporate governance over the business cycle," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(11), pages 2117-2141, November.
  7. Jean Boivin & Marc P. Giannoni, 2006. "Has Monetary Policy Become More Effective?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 88(3), pages 445-462, August.
  8. Kuralbayeva, Karlygash & Vines, David, 2006. "Terms of Trade Shocks in an Intertemporal Model: Should We Worry about the Dutch Disease or Excessive Borrowing?," CEPR Discussion Papers 5857, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  9. Monika Merz & Eran Yashiv, 2007. "Labor and the Market Value of the Firm," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 97(4), pages 1419-1431, September.
  10. Leonid Kogan & Dimitris Papanikolaou & Amit Seru & Noah Stoffman, 2012. "Technological Innovation, Resource Allocation, and Growth," NBER Working Papers 17769, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  11. Brahima Coulibaly, 2005. "Effects of financial autarky and integration: the case of the South Africa embargo," International Finance Discussion Papers 839, Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (U.S.).
  12. Karlygash Kuralbayeva, 2007. "Inflation persistence: Implications for a design of monetary policy in a small open economy subject to external shocks," CEIS Research Paper 93, Tor Vergata University, CEIS.
  13. Ott, Ingrid & Soretz, Susanne, 2006. "Infrastruktur als Investitionsdeterminante von KMU," Hannover Economic Papers (HEP) dp-329, Leibniz Universität Hannover, Wirtschaftswissenschaftliche Fakultät.
  14. Coulibaly, Brahima, 2009. "Effects of financial autarky and integration: The case of the South Africa embargo," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 454-478, April.

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