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Explaining African Growth Performance: A Production-Frontier Approach

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  • Romain Houssa

    ()

  • Oleg Badunenko
  • Daniel J. Henderson

    (Center for Research in the Economics of Development, University of Namur)

Abstract

This paper employs a production frontier approach that allows distinguishing technologic progress from efficiency development. Data on 35 African countries in 1970-2007 show that efficiency losses have constrained growth in Africa while technology progress has played a marginal growth enhancing role in the region. Moreover, physical and human capital accumulation are the main factors that drive productivity growth at the country level. Examining the outcomes of successful countries suggests that good governance, institutional quality and good policies are key factors for improving economic development in Africa. These factors are even more required in Sub-Saharan Africa given the natural constraints of geography in the region.

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File URL: http://www.fundp.ac.be/eco/economie/recherche/wpseries/wp/1013.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Namur, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers with number 1013.

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Length: 55 pages
Date of creation: Nov 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nam:wpaper:1013

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Cited by:
  1. Shahram Amini & Michele Battisti & Christopher F. Parmeter, 2011. "Decomposing The Conditional Variance of Cross-Country Output," Working Papers, University of Miami, Department of Economics 2011-18, University of Miami, Department of Economics.

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