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Business Cycle Linkages for the G7 Countries: Does the US Lead the World?

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  • Denise R Osborn
  • Pedro J Perez
  • Marianne Sensier

Abstract

This paper empirically models the relationship between quarterly business cycle movements in the US and the other G7 countries, including an analysis of the US with a European (E15) aggregate. By using a nonlinear smooth transition vector autoregressive framework, the possibility of asymmetric business cycle linkages is explored. Statistical testing almost always rejects linearity, with the nonlinearity in the VAR generally associated with lagged annual US growth. To represent different types of possible business cycle linkages, three nonlinear VAR models are estimated for each country with the US, where these represent common business cycle regimes, US-led (but not common) regimes and country-specific (or idiosyncratic) regimes. In general, high annual US growth is found to lead to a distinct business cycle regime in other G7 countries compared with average or low US growth. Tests indicate that quarterly US growth patterns are important for other countries primarily in the lower regime, with domestic autoregressive lags then sometimes insignificant.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economics, The University of Manchester in its series The School of Economics Discussion Paper Series with number 0527.

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Date of creation: 2005
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Handle: RePEc:man:sespap:0527

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Web page: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/economics/
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  1. Pesaran, M.H. & Weiner, S.M., 2001. "Modelling Regional Interdependencies Using a Global Error-Correcting Macroeconometric Model," Cambridge Working Papers in Economics 0119, Faculty of Economics, University of Cambridge.
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Cited by:
  1. Gerhard Fenz & Martin Schneider, 2008. "Transmission of business cycle shocks between the US and the euro area," Working Papers 145, Oesterreichische Nationalbank (Austrian Central Bank).
  2. Eickmeier, Sandra & Ng, Tim, 2011. "Forecasting national activity using lots of international predictors: An application to New Zealand," International Journal of Forecasting, Elsevier, vol. 27(2), pages 496-511, April.
  3. Michaelides, Panayotis G. & Papageorgiou, Theofanis, 2012. "On the transmission of economic fluctuations from the USA to EU-15 (1960–2011)," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 64(6), pages 427-438.
  4. Stephane Dees & Arthur Saint-Guilhem, 2011. "The role of the United States in the global economy and its evolution over time," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 41(3), pages 573-591, December.
  5. Erden, Lutfi & Ozkan, Ibrahim, 2014. "Determinants of international transmission of business cycles to Turkish economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 36(C), pages 383-390.
  6. Dées, Stéphane & Vansteenkiste, Isabel, 2007. "The transmission of US cyclical developments to the rest of the world," Working Paper Series 0798, European Central Bank.

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