Advanced Search
MyIDEAS: Login

Identifying Changes in Mean, Seasonality, Persistence and Volatility for G7 and Euro Area Inflation

Contents:

Author Info

  • Erdenebat Bataa
  • Denise R. Osborn
  • Marianne Sensier
  • Dick van Dijk

Abstract

This study examines the properties of monthly CPI inflation in G7 countries and the Euro area (aggregate) over the period 1973-2007 using a new iterative decomposition procedure that separates changes in mean, seasonal and dynamic components together with conditional volatility. We uncover mean and seasonality breaks for all countries and, even allowing for these, changes in persistence are indicated for all countries except Canada. Further, while volatility reductions are widespread in the mid- to early 1980s, Canada, France and the US all exhibit increased volatility from 1999 onwards. Of methodological interest, iteration is shown to provide more evidence of persistence breaks and fewer volatility breaks overall compared with the usual approach of sequentially examining changes in the properties of inflation, while application of linear seasonal adjustment also reduces evidence of persistence breaks. Although failure to allow for breaks in mean, seasonal or dynamic components affects conclusions about the existence and dates of volatility breaks, nevertheless, evidence remains of a volatility increase in some countries in 1999.

Download Info

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.
File URL: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/medialibrary/cgbcr/discussionpapers/dpcgbcr109.pdf
Download Restriction: no

Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester in its series Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series with number 109.

as in new window
Length: 36 pages
Date of creation: 2008
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:109

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Manchester M13 9PL
Phone: (0)161 275 4868
Fax: (0)161 275 4812
Web page: http://www.socialsciences.manchester.ac.uk/subjects/economics/our-research/centre-for-growth-and-business-cycle-research/
More information through EDIRC

Related research

Keywords:

References

No references listed on IDEAS
You can help add them by filling out this form.

Citations

Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
as in new window

Cited by:
  1. Jesper Roine & Daniel Waldenström, 2011. "Common Trends and Shocks to Top Incomes: A Structural Breaks Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 93(3), pages 832-846, August.
  2. Elena Andreou & Alessandra Pelloni & Marianne Sensier, 2008. "Is Volatility Good for Growth? Evidence from the G7," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 97, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.
  3. Steffen Henzel & Elisabeth Wieland, 2013. "Synchronization and Changes in International Inflation Uncertainty," CESifo Working Paper Series 4194, CESifo Group Munich.
  4. Erdenebat Bataa & Denise R. Osborn & Marianne Sensier & Dick van Dijk, 2009. "Structural Breaks in the International Transmission of Inflation," Centre for Growth and Business Cycle Research Discussion Paper Series 119, Economics, The Univeristy of Manchester.

Lists

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

Statistics

Access and download statistics

Corrections

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:man:cgbcrp:109. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Marianne Sensier).

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.