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Does Raising the School Leaving Age Reduce Teacher Effort? A Note from a Policy Experiment

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  • C Green
  • M Navarro Paniagua

Abstract

This paper examines the impact of an increase in the school leaving age on high school teachers’ absence behaviour. We estimate differ- ence in difference models of absenteeism using count data approaches. Employing data from the Spanish Labour Force Survey, our findings suggest that high school teachers reduced their effort due to the re- form that raised the age of compulsory education commencing in the academic year 1998-1999 in Spain. In particular, they take 15% more sickness absence in the posttreatment period. This result should be of interest to both policy makers and researchers who rely upon com- pulsory school law changes as a source of exogenous variation in edu- cational attainment.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department in its series Working Papers with number 609674.

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Date of creation: 2010
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Handle: RePEc:lan:wpaper:609674

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  1. Barmby, Tim A. & Ercolani, Marco G. & Treble, John G., 2000. "Sickness Absence: An International Comparison," IRISS Working Paper Series, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD 2000-03, IRISS at CEPS/INSTEAD.
  2. Miguel A. Delgado & Thomas J. Kniesner, 1997. "Count Data Models With Variance Of Unknown Form: An Application To A Hedonic Model Of Worker Absenteeism," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(1), pages 41-49, February.
  3. Esther Duflo & Rema Hanna, 2005. "Monitoring Works: Getting Teachers to Come to School," NBER Working Papers 11880, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Harmon, Colm & Walker, Ian, 1995. "Estimates of the Economic Return to Schooling for the United Kingdom," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, American Economic Association, vol. 85(5), pages 1278-86, December.
  5. Raegen T. Miller & Richard J. Murnane & John B. Willett, 2007. "Do Teacher Absences Impact Student Achievement? Longitudinal Evidence from One Urban School District," NBER Working Papers 13356, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Caitlin Knowles Myers & Mark L. Pocock, 2008. "Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26(2), pages 223-246, 04.
  7. Lozano, Fernando A., 2009. "The Flexibility of the Workweek in the United States: Evidence from the FIFA World Cup," IZA Discussion Papers 4217, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Marie Connolly, 2008. "Here Comes the Rain Again: Weather and the Intertemporal Substitution of Leisure," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, University of Chicago Press, vol. 26, pages 73-100.
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