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Cues for Timing and Coordination: Latitude, Letterman, and Longitude

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh
  • Caitlin Knowles Myers
  • Mark L. Pocock

Abstract

Daylight, television schedules, and time zones can alter timing and induce temporal coordination of economic activities. With the American Time Use Survey for 2003-2004 and data from Australia for 1992, we show that television schedules and the locations of time zones affect the timing of market work and sleep, with differences in timing being generated partly by returns to coordination with other agents. The responsiveness to time zone differences is greatest among workers in industries in national markets. An exogenous shock resulting from an area's nonadherence to daylight saving time leads its residents to alter work schedules to coordinate with people elsewhere. (c) 2008 by The University of Chicago. All rights reserved..

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 26 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (04)
Pages: 223-246

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:26:y:2008:i:2:p:223-246

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Web page: http://www.journals.uchicago.edu/JOLE/

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Citations

Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Should we get rid of time zones?
    by Brad Plumer in Ezra Klein's Wonkblog on 2012-03-17 12:25:15
Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
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Cited by:
  1. Gibson, Matthew & Shrader, Jeffrey, 2014. "Time Use and Productivity: The Wage Returns to Sleep," University of California at San Diego, Economics Working Paper Series qt8zp518hc, Department of Economics, UC San Diego.
  2. Felix Weinhardt, 2013. "The Importance of Time Zone Assignment: Evidence from Residential Electricity Consumption," SERC Discussion Papers serddp0126, Spatial Economics Research Centre, LSE.
  3. Fernando A Lozano, 2011. "The Flexibility Of The Workweek In The United States: Evidence From The Fifa World Cup," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 49(2), pages 512-529, 04.
  4. Harley FRAZIS & Jay STEWART, 2012. "How to Think About Time-Use Data : What Inferences Can We Make About Long and Short-Run Time Use from Time Diaries ?," Annales d'Economie et de Statistique, ENSAE, issue 105-106, pages 11.
  5. Lozano, Fernando A., 2012. "What Happened to God's Time? The Evolution of Secularism and Hours of Work in America, Evidence from Religious Holidays," IZA Discussion Papers 6552, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  6. Morikawa, Masayuki, 2012. "Demand fluctuations and productivity of service industries," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(1), pages 256-258.
  7. Ribar, David C., 2012. "Immigrants' Time Use: A Survey of Methods and Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 6931, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. C Green & M Navarro Paniagua, 2010. "Does Raising the School Leaving Age Reduce Teacher Effort? A Note from a Policy Experiment," Working Papers 609674, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
  9. Almudena Sevilla & Jose Gimenez-Nadal & Jonathan Gershuny, 2012. "Leisure Inequality in the United States: 1965–2003," Demography, Springer, vol. 49(3), pages 939-964, August.
  10. Daniel Hamermesh, 2009. "It’s Time to “Do Economics” with Time-Use Data," Social Indicators Research, Springer, vol. 93(1), pages 65-68, August.
  11. Wolff, Hendrik & Makino, Momoe, 2012. "Extending Becker's Time Allocation Theory to Model Continuous Time Blocks: Evidence from Daylight Saving Time," IZA Discussion Papers 6787, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. González Chapela, Jorge, 2014. "Split or straight? Some evidence on the effect of the work shift on Spanish workers' well-being and time use," MPRA Paper 57301, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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