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On the Possibility of a Lowland Rice Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa:

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Author Info

  • Kijima, Yoko
  • Ito, Yukinori
  • Otsuka, Keijiro

Abstract

In many countries in Sub-Saharan Africa, rapid urbanization has led to a surge in demand for rice in urban areas. However, most of the supply depends on imported rice since rice is not a staple food in the rural areas and domestic production is still limited. In order for domestically grown rice to compete with imported rice, improvements in the productivity of rice cultivation are essential in Eastern Uganda. Although rice production has been expanding since the end of the 1990s, its productivity is quite low because basic rice cultivation practices have not been widely adopted. To raise this low level of productivity, JICA has provided training on basic production practices along with small irrigation schemes that are constructed by the farmers themselves. This study attempts to understand the impacts of the demonstration of or training in improved lowland rice management practices on their diffusion and on rice yields using the case of the JICA program in Eastern Uganda. The most important finding of this study is that lowland rice yields can be extremely high in Uganda if basic production practices, such as bunding, leveling, and straight-row planting, are adopted along with the introduction of modern rice varieties and the use of simple irrigation systems, even if chemical fertilizer is not applied. The major challenge is how to find the most appropriate means of disseminating such a package of improved production practices to the farmers. According to our analysis, the intensity of participation in the training is the key to the adoption of these basic production practices. It was also found that training participation decreases the further the distance the participants live from the demonstration plot.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10685/47
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File URL: http://repository.ri.jica.go.jp/dspace/bitstream/10685/47/1/JICA-RI_WP_No.25_2010.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by JICA Research Institute in its series Working Papers with number 25.

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Date of creation: 09 Dec 2010
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Handle: RePEc:jic:wpaper:25

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Keywords: lowland rice ; cultivation practices ; diffusion of technology ; yield enhancement ; Uganda;

References

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  1. Keijiro Otsuka & Takashi Yamano, 2005. "The Possibility of a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Kenya," The Electronic Journal of Agricultural and Development Economics, Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations, vol. 2(1), pages 7-19.
  2. Inocencio, Arlene & Kikuchi, Masao & Tonosaki, Manabu & Maruyama, Atsushi & Merrey, Douglas & Sally, Hilmy & de Jong, Ijsbrand, 2007. "Costs and performance of irrigation projects: A comparison of Sub-Saharan Africa and other developing regions," IWMI Research Reports H036214, International Water Management Institute.
  3. Keijiro Otsuka & Yoko Kijima, 2010. "Technology Policies for a Green Revolution and Agricultural Transformation in Africa," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 19(suppl_2), pages 60-76.
  4. Ivanic, Maros & Martin, Will, 2008. "Implications of higher global food prices for poverty in low-income countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4594, The World Bank.
  5. Todd Benson & Samuel Mugarura & Kelly Wanda, 2008. "Impacts in Uganda of rising global food prices: the role of diversified staples and limited price transmission," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 39(s1), pages 513-524, November.
  6. Timothy Conley & Udry Christopher, 2001. "Social Learning Through Networks: The Adoption of New Agricultural Technologies in Ghana," American Journal of Agricultural Economics, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association, vol. 83(3), pages 668-673.
  7. Kei Kajisa & K. Palanisami & Takeshi Sakurai, 2007. "Effects on poverty and equity of the decline in collective tank irrigation management in Tamil Nadu, India," Agricultural Economics, International Association of Agricultural Economists, vol. 36(3), pages 347-362, 05.
  8. Dalton, Timothy J. & Guei, Robert G., 2003. "Productivity Gains from Rice Genetic Enhancements in West Africa: Countries and Ecologies," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(2), pages 359-374, February.
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