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Impacts in Uganda of rising global food prices: the role of diversified staples and limited price transmission

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  • Todd Benson
  • Samuel Mugarura
  • Kelly Wanda

Abstract

This study assesses the potential impact of rising world food prices on the welfare of Ugandan households. While Uganda experienced sharply higher food prices in 2008, as a landlocked, food-exporting country the causes of those price changes were mainly regional and indirect rather than directly transmitted from global markets. Using trade volumes, food prices, and household survey data we describe how Uganda, unlike some other countries, is partially shielded from direct impacts of global food price movements. Although the majority of Ugandans are net food buyers, the adverse impact at household-level of rising global prices is moderated by the relatively large quantity and range of staples consumed that come from home production. Moreover, several of these are not widely traded. Some population groups in Uganda are vulnerable to rising food prices, however, primarily those for whom maize is an important staple, including those dependent upon humanitarian relief and the urban poor. Only a relatively small group of Ugandan households will benefit directly and immediately from rising food prices-the significant net sellers of food crops constituting between 12% and 27% of the population. In this assessment we do not estimate the level and extent of wider second round effects from these higher prices. Copyright (c) 2008 International Association of Agricultural Economists.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by International Association of Agricultural Economists in its journal Agricultural Economics.

Volume (Year): 39 (2008)
Issue (Month): s1 (November)
Pages: 513-524

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Handle: RePEc:bla:agecon:v:39:y:2008:i:s1:p:513-524

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Cited by:
  1. Baltzer, Kenneth, 2013. "International to domestic price transmission in fourteen developing countries during the 2007-08 food crisis," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  2. Anna D'Souza & Dean Jolliffe, 2012. "Rising Food Prices and Coping Strategies: Household-level Evidence from Afghanistan," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 48(2), pages 282-299, August.
  3. Boysen, Ole & Matthews, Alan, 2012. "The differentiated effects of food price spikes on poverty in Uganda," 123rd Seminar, February 23-24, 2012, Dublin, Ireland 122445, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
  4. Lazzaroni, S. & Bedi, A.S., 2014. "Weather variability and food consumption," ISS Working Papers - General Series 585, International Institute of Social Studies of Erasmus University Rotterdam (ISS), The Hague.
  5. Kijima, Yoko, 2012. "Expansion of Lowland Rice Production and Constraints on a Rice Green Revolution: Evidence from Uganda," Working Papers 49, JICA Research Institute.
  6. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2012. "Assessing the Impact of Training on Lowland Rice Productivity in an African Setting: Evidence from Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 40(8), pages 1610-1618.
  7. Ole Boysen, 2009. "Border Price Shocks, Spatial Price Variation, and their Impacts on Poverty in Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp306, IIIS.
  8. Boysen, Ole, 2013. "High Food Prices and their Implications for Poverty in Uganda From Demand System Estimation to Simulation," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150700, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  9. Van Campenhout, Bjorn & Pauw, Karl & Minot, Nicholas, 2013. "The impact of food prices shocks in Uganda: First-order versus long-run effects:," IFPRI discussion papers 1284, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  10. Goetz, Linde & Glauben, Thomas & Brummer, Bernhard, 2010. "How Did Policy Interventions In Wheat Export Markets In Russia And Ukraine During The Food Crisis 2007/2008 Influence World Market Price Transmission?," 50st Annual Conference, Braunschweig, Germany, September 29-October 1, 2010 93952, German Association of Agricultural Economists (GEWISOLA).
  11. Ssewanyana, Sarah N. & Kasirye, Ibrahim, 2010. "Food security in Uganda: a dilemma to achieving the millennium development goal," Research Series 113614, Economic Policy Research Centre (EPRC).
  12. Kijima, Yoko & Ito, Yukinori & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2010. "On the Possibility of a Lowland Rice Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa:," Working Papers 25, JICA Research Institute.
  13. Hovland, Ingeborg, 2009. "The food crisis of 2008: Impact assessment of IFPRI's communications strategy," Impact assessments 29, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  14. Ole Boysen, 2012. "A Food Demand System Estimation for Uganda," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp396, IIIS.
  15. Giovanni Andrea Cornia & Laura Deotti & Maria Sassi, 2012. "Food Price Volatility over the Last Decade in Niger and Malawi: Extent, Sources and Impact on Child Malnutrition," Working Papers 2012-002, United Nations Development Programme, Regional Bureau for Africa (UNDP/RBA).
  16. Van Campenhout, Bjorn & Lecoutere, Els & D'Exelle, Ben, 2011. "Trading in turbulent times: Smallholder maize marketing in the southern highlands, Tanzania," IFPRI discussion papers 1099, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  17. Timothy A. Wise, 2012. "The Cost to Developing Countries of U.S. Corn Ethanol Expansion," GDAE Working Papers 12-02, GDAE, Tufts University.
  18. D'Souza, Anna & Jolliffe, Dean, 2010. "Food Security in Afghanistan: Household-level Evidence from the 2007-08 Food Price Crisis," 2010 Annual Meeting, July 25-27, 2010, Denver, Colorado 61139, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
  19. Lazzaroni, Sara, 2013. "Weather variability and food consumption: Evidence from rural Uganda," 2013 Second Congress, June 6-7, 2013, Parma, Italy 149774, Italian Association of Agricultural and Applied Economics (AIEAA).
  20. Kijima, Yoko & Otsuka, Keijiro & Sserunkuuma, Dick, 2011. "An Inquiry into Constraints on a Green Revolution in Sub-Saharan Africa: The Case of NERICA Rice in Uganda," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 77-86, January.
  21. Dimova, Ralitza & Gbakou, Monnet, 2013. "The Global Food Crisis: Disaster, Opportunity or Non-event? Household Level Evidence from Côte d’Ivoire," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 46(C), pages 185-196.

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