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Firm-Level Hiring Difficulties: Persistence, Business Cycle and Local Labour Market Influences

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  • Fabling, Richard

    ()
    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research Trust)

  • Maré, Dave C.

    ()
    (Motu Economic and Public Policy Research Trust)

Abstract

We examine the correlates of reported hiring difficulties at the firm level using linked employer-employee and panel survey data over 2005-2011, focussing on the relative influence of firm-level characteristics, persistence, the business cycle and local labour market liquidity. At both the aggregate and the firm-level, hiring difficulties eased after the onset of the Global Financial Crisis. Even in the presence of large cyclical changes in demand and labour market conditions, firm-level persistence is a dominant feature of the data, with one- and two-year lags of reported hiring difficulties both positively related to current difficulties. Firms paying higher wages are more likely to report difficulties when trying to hire skilled workers, while firms with more long tenure workers are less likely to report any difficulty hiring. Local labour market conditions appear unrelated to reported hiring difficulties.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 7534.

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Length: 46 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp7534

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Keywords: hiring difficulties; hard-to-fill vacancies; local labour market; Global Financial Crisis;

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  1. Richard Fabling, 2011. "Keeping it Together: Tracking Firms on New Zealand’s Longitudinal Business Database," Working Papers 11_01, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  2. Haskel, Jonathan & Martin, Christopher, 2001. "Technology, Wages, and Skill Shortages: Evidence from UK Micro Data," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 53(4), pages 642-58, October.
  3. Richard Fabling & Arthur Grimes, 2009. "The "suite" smell of success: complementary personnel practices and firm performance," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series DP2009/13, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
  4. Barbara Petrongolo & Christopher A. Pissarides, 2000. "Looking Into the Black Box: A Survey of the Matching Function," CEP Discussion Papers dp0470, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
  5. Schank, Thorsten & Schnabel, Claus & Wagner, Joachim, 2007. "Do exporters really pay higher wages? First evidence from German linked employer-employee data," Journal of International Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(1), pages 52-74, May.
  6. Richard Fabling & David C. Maré, 2012. "Cyclical Labour Market Adjustment in New Zealand: The Response of Firms to the Global Financial Crisis and its Implications for Workers," Working Papers 12_04, Motu Economic and Public Policy Research.
  7. Richard Fabling, 2009. "A Rough Guide to New Zealand's Longitudinal Business Database," Global COE Hi-Stat Discussion Paper Series gd09-103, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University.
  8. Papps, Kerry L. & Newell, James O., 2002. "Identifying Functional Labour Market Areas in New Zealand: A Reconnaissance Study Using Travel-to-Work Data," IZA Discussion Papers 443, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Haskel, Jonathan & Martin, Christopher, 1993. "The Causes of Skill Shortages in Britain," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 45(4), pages 573-88, October.
  10. Maré, Dave C. & Fabling, Richard & Stillman, Steven, 2011. "Immigration and Innovation," IZA Discussion Papers 5686, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Oyer, Paul & Schaefer, Scott, 2011. "Personnel Economics: Hiring and Incentives," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
  12. Mok, Penny & Mason, Geoff & Stevens, Philip & Timmins, Jason, 2012. "A Good Worker is Hard to Find: Skills Shortages in New Zealand Firms," Occasional Papers 12/5, Ministry of Economic Development, New Zealand.
  13. Moretti, Enrico, 2011. "Local Labor Markets," Handbook of Labor Economics, Elsevier.
  14. Green, Francis & Machin, Stephen & Wilkinson, David, 1998. "The Meaning and Determinants of Skills Shortages," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 60(2), pages 165-87, May.
  15. Haskel, Jonathan & Martin, Christopher, 1993. "Do Skill Shortages Reduce Productivity? Theory and Evidence from the United Kingdom," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 103(417), pages 386-94, March.
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