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Economic, Neurobiological and Behavioral Perspectives on Building America's Future Workforce

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Author Info

  • Knudsen, Eric I.

    ()
    (Stanford University)

  • Heckman, James J.

    ()
    (University of Chicago)

  • Cameron, Judy L.

    ()
    (University of Pittsburgh)

  • Shonkoff, Jack P.

    ()
    (Harvard University)

Abstract

A growing proportion of the U.S. workforce will have been raised in disadvantaged environments that are associated with relatively high proportions of individuals with diminished cognitive and social skills. A cross-disciplinary examination of research in economics, developmental psychology, and neurobiology reveals a striking convergence on a set of common principles that account for the potent effects of early environment on the capacity for human skill development. Central to these principles are the findings that early experiences have a uniquely powerful influence on the development of cognitive and social skills, as well as on brain architecture and neurochemistry; that both skill development and brain maturation are hierarchical processes in which higher level functions depend on, and build on, lower level functions; and that the capacity for change in the foundations of human skill development and neural circuitry is highest earlier in life and decreases over time. These findings lead to the conclusion that the most efficient strategy for strengthening the future workforce, both economically and neurobiologically, and for improving its quality of life is to invest in the environments of disadvantaged children during the early childhood years.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 2190.

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Length: 35 pages
Date of creation: Jul 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: World Economics, 2006, 7 (3), 17 - 41
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2190

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Related research

Keywords: child development; early experience; economic productivity; critical and sensitive periods; brain development;

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  1. Cunha, Flavio & Heckman, James J. & Lochner, Lance, 2006. "Interpreting the Evidence on Life Cycle Skill Formation," Handbook of the Economics of Education, Elsevier, Elsevier.
  2. David Blau & Janet Currie, 2004. "Preschool, Day Care, and Afterschool Care: Who's Minding the Kids?," NBER Working Papers 10670, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Carneiro, Pedro & Heckman, James J., 2003. "Human Capital Policy," IZA Discussion Papers 821, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
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