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Foreign Direct Investment in Ireland: Policy Implications for Emerging Economies

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  • Frances Ruane
  • Peter J. Buckley

Abstract

The increasingly important role of multinational enterprises (MNEs) in the global economy is linked to questions of how the foreign direct investment (FDI) they control impacts on overall economic activity in the recipient countries. Of specific interest is the policy context in which such FDI flows into the developing country and how a government can influence the impact of those flows. This paper reviews some of the literature in two key contextual areas, namely, when the host country policy regime promotes FDI selectively, and secondly, where it promotes the creation of industrial clusters. It explores the insights of this literature for the development of the strong MNE sector in the Irish economy and draws lessons from the Irish experience for emerging economies.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by IIIS in its series The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series with number iiisdp113.

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Date of creation: 05 Apr 2006
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Handle: RePEc:iis:dispap:iiisdp113

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Cited by:
  1. Eoin O'Malley, 2012. "A Survey of Explanations for the Celtic Tiger Boom," The Institute for International Integration Studies Discussion Paper Series iiisdp417, IIIS.
  2. World Bank, 2009. "Macedonia - Moving to Faster and More Inclusive Growth A Country Economic Memorandum : Main Report and Annex," World Bank Other Operational Studies 3067, The World Bank.
  3. David Bailey & Helena Lenihan & Ajit Singh, 2008. "Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright? Industrial Policy Lessons from Ireland and East Asia for Small African Economies," ESRC Centre for Business Research - Working Papers wp374, ESRC Centre for Business Research.
  4. Bose, Pinaki & Jetter, Michael, 2012. "Liberalization and tax amnesty in a developing economy," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 761-765.
  5. Crafts, Nicholas, 2008. "The Celtic Tiger In Historical And International Perspective," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 867, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
  6. Teague, Paul, . "Committing to Economic Openness and Building Domestic Institutional Capabilities Keywords: Ireland, economic growth, economic development, inward investment, economic systems Creation-Date: 2009," Working Paper Series UNU-WIDER Research Paper , World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).
  7. Liu, Bih Jane, 2011. "MNEs and Local Linkages: Evidence from Taiwanese Affiliates," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 39(4), pages 633-647, April.
  8. David Bailey & Helena Lenihan & Ajit Singh, 2009. "Lessons for African Economies from Irish and East Asian Industrial Policy," Journal of Industry, Competition and Trade, Springer, vol. 9(4), pages 357-382, December.

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