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Growth Effects of Consumption Jealousy in a Two-Sector Model

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  • Duernecker, Georg

    (Department of Economics, European University Institute, Florence, Italy)

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    Abstract

    This paper aims at analyzing the implications of individuals’ consumption jealousy on the dynamic structure of a two-sector model economy. We find that status-seeking substantially influences both, the long-term properties and the adjustment behavior of the model. Depending on the status motive, productivity disturbances might induce countercyclical responses of work effort whereas preference shocks are expected to generate an overshooting relative capital intensity. Generally we find that, for empirically plausible values of the intertemporal elasticity of substitution, a higher degree of consumption jealousy induces agents to devote more time to education which stimulates human capital accumulation and hence promotes economic growth.

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    File URL: http://www.ihs.ac.at/publications/eco/es-201.pdf
    File Function: First version, 2007
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Institute for Advanced Studies in its series Economics Series with number 201.

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    Length: 30 pages
    Date of creation: Jan 2007
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ihs:ihsesp:201

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    Related research

    Keywords: Status-seeking; Economic growth; Transitional dynamics; Human capital;

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    References

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    Cited by:
    1. Hiraguchi, Ryoji, 2011. "A two sector endogenous growth model with habit formation," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 430-441, April.

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