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Loyal Lenders or Fickle Financiers: Foreign Banks in Latin America

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  • Arturo Galindo

    ()

  • Alejandro Micco
  • Andrew Powell

Abstract

We suggest that foreign banks may represent a trade-off for their developing country hosts. A portfolio model is developed to show that a more diversified international bank may be one of lower, overall risk and less susceptible to funding shocks but may react more to shocks that affect expected returns in a particular host country. Foreign banks have become particularly important in Latin America where we find strong support for these theoretical predictions using a dataset of individual Latin American banks in 11 countries. Moreover, we find no significant difference between the size of the response of foreign banks to a negative liquidity shock and a positive opportunity shock: in both cases the market share of foreign banks in credit increases.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department in its series Research Department Publications with number 4403.

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Date of creation: Dec 2005
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Handle: RePEc:idb:wpaper:4403

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References

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  1. de Haas, Ralph & van Lelyveld, Iman, 2006. "Foreign banks and credit stability in Central and Eastern Europe. A panel data analysis," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 30(7), pages 1927-1952, July.
  2. Joe Peek & Eric S. Rosengren, 2000. "Implications of the globalization of the banking sector: the Latin American experience," New England Economic Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Boston, issue Sep, pages 45-62.
  3. Linda S. Goldberg, 2002. "When Is U.S. Bank Lending to Emerging Markets Volatile?," NBER Chapters, in: Preventing Currency Crises in Emerging Markets, pages 171-196 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Eric S. Rosengren & Joe Peek, 2000. "Collateral Damage: Effects of the Japanese Bank Crisis on Real Activity in the United States," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(1), pages 30-45, March.
  5. Guillermo A. Calvo & Enrique G. Mendoza, 1999. "Regional Contagion and the Globalization of Securities Markets," NBER Working Papers 7153, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. Jennifer S. Crystal & B. Gerard Dages & Linda S. Goldberg, 2002. "Has foreign bank entry led to sounder banks in Latin America?," Current Issues in Economics and Finance, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, vol. 8(Jan).
  7. B. Gerard Dages & Linda Goldberg & Daniel Kinney, 2000. "Foreign and domestic bank participation in emerging markets: lessons from Mexico and Argentina," Economic Policy Review, Federal Reserve Bank of New York, issue Sep, pages 17-36.
  8. Kim, Daesik & Santomero, Anthony M, 1988. " Risk in Banking and Capital Regulation," Journal of Finance, American Finance Association, vol. 43(5), pages 1219-33, December.
  9. Rochet, Jean-Charles, 1992. "Capital requirements and the behaviour of commercial banks," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 36(5), pages 1137-1170, June.
  10. Reinhart, Carmen & Calvo, Guillermo & Leiderman, Leonardo, 1992. "Capital Inflows and Real Exchange Rate Appreciation in Latin America," MPRA Paper 13843, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  11. International Monetary Fund, 2000. "Spillovers Through Banking Centers - A Panel Data Analysis," IMF Working Papers 00/88, International Monetary Fund.
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Cited by:
  1. Jose A. Lopez & Mark M. Spiegel, 2006. "Foreign bank lending and bond underwriting in Japan during the lost decade," Working Paper Series 2006-45, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  2. Meriem Haouat & Diego N. Moccero & Ramiro Sosa Navarro, 2012. "Foreign Banks and Credit Volatility: The Case of Latin American Countries," Review of International Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 20(5), pages 1017-1033, November.
  3. Linda S. Goldberg, 2005. "The International Exposure of U.S. Banks," NBER Working Papers 11365, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Alejandro Micco & Ugo Panizza, 2004. "Propiedad de la banca y conducta crediticia," Research Department Publications 4386, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
  5. Alejandro Micco & Ugo Panizza, 2006. "Bank Ownership and Lending Behavior," Working Papers Central Bank of Chile 369, Central Bank of Chile.
  6. Jeon, Bang Nam & Olivero, María Pía & Wu, Ji, 2011. "Do foreign banks increase competition? Evidence from emerging Asian and Latin American banking markets," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 856-875, April.

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