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How would Capital Account Liberalisation Affect China's Capital Flows and the Renminbi Real Exchange Rates?

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Author Info

  • Dong He

    (Hong Kong Monetary Authority and Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research)

  • Lillian Cheung

    (Hong Kong Monetary Authority)

  • Wenlang Zhang

    (Hong Kong Monetary Authority)

  • Tommy Wu

    (Hong Kong Monetary Authority)

Abstract

In this paper we study the determinants of gross capital flows, project the size of China's international investment positions in 2020 and analyse the implications for the renminbi real exchange rates. We assume in this exercise that the renminbi will have largely achieved capital account convertibility by the end of this decade, a timetable consistent with recent proposals by the People's Bank of China. Our analysis shows that China's gross international investment positions would grow significantly, and inflows and outflows would become much more balanced. The private sector would turn its net liability position into a balanced position, and the official sector would reduce its net asset position significantly, relative to the country¡¦s GDP. Because of the increasing importance of private sector foreign claims and the decreasing importance of official foreign reserves, China would be able to earn higher net investment incomes from abroad. Overall, China would continue to be a net creditor, with the net foreign asset position as a share of GDP remaining largely stable through this decade. These findings suggest that the renminbi real exchange rate would not be particularly sensitive to capital account liberalisation as capital flows are expected to be two-sided. The renminbi real exchange rate would likely be on a path of moderate appreciation as China is expected to maintain a sizeable growth differential with its trading partners.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research in its series Working Papers with number 092012.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Apr 2012
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hkm:wpaper:092012

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Keywords: Capital Account Liberalisation; Net Foreign Asset Position; Exchange Rates;

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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Dong He & Paul Luk, 2013. "A Model of Chinese Capital Account Liberalisation," Working Papers 122013, Hong Kong Institute for Monetary Research.
  2. Herrala, Risto & Cheung, Yin-Wong, 2013. "China’s capital controls – Through the prism of covered interest differentials," BOFIT Discussion Papers 22/2013, Bank of Finland, Institute for Economies in Transition.

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