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The multi-dimensional nature of labor demand and skill-biased technical change

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  • Mellander, Erik

    ()
    (IFAU - Office of Labour Market Policy Evaluation)

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    Abstract

    Investigating the robustness of the skill-biased technical change hypothesis, this analysis incorporates two novel features. First, effective labor is modeled as the product of a quantity measure - number of employees with a given level of education - and a quality index, depending on, i.a., demographic characteristics and fields-of-study. Second, low-skilled labor is more disaggregated than in earlier studies. A fully specified structural model is used, containing demand equations for four categories of labor, two types of capital and intermediate goods. The empirical application covers 24 industries in the Swedish manufacturing sector 1985-1995. The skill-bias is further corroborated: it is confirmed although the specification of effective labor is supported. Substantial differences are, however, found among the low-skilled.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy in its series Working Paper Series with number 1999:9.

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    Length: 64 pages
    Date of creation: 08 Dec 1999
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:hhs:ifauwp:1999_009

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    Postal: IFAU, P O Box 513, SE-751 20 Uppsala, Sweden
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    Related research

    Keywords: Robustness test; Labor quality; Heterogenous low-skilled; Manufacturing application;

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    References

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    1. Eugenia Kazamaki Ottersten & Thomas Lindh Mellander, 1999. "Evaluating firm training, effects on performance and labour demand," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(7), pages 431-437.
    2. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Machin, Stephen, 1997. "Implications of Skill-Biased Technological Change: International Evidence," Working Paper Series 486, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    3. Machin, Steve, 1994. "Changes in the Relative Demand for Skills in the UK Labour Market," CEPR Discussion Papers 952, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    4. Griliches, Zvi, 1969. "Capital-Skill Complementarity," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 51(4), pages 465-68, November.
    5. Machin, Steve & Van Reenen, John, 1996. "Technology and Changes in Skill Structure: Evidence from an International Panel of Industries," CEPR Discussion Papers 1434, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Stephen Machin & John Van Reenen, 1998. "Technology and changes in skill structure: evidence from seven OECD countries," IFS Working Papers W98/04, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    7. Hansson, Pär, 1999. "Relative Demand for Skills in Swedish Manufacturing: Technology or Trade?," Working Paper Series 152, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    8. van Ours, J. C. & Ridder, G., 1995. "Job matching and job competition: Are lower educated workers at the back of job queues?," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 39(9), pages 1717-1731, December.
    9. Morrison, Catherine J, 1988. "Quasi-Fixed Inputs in U.S. and Japanese Manufacturing: A Generalized Leontief Restricted Cost Function Approach," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 70(2), pages 275-87, May.
    10. Morrison, C. J. & Berndt, E. R., 1981. "Short-run labor productivity in a dynamic model," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 16(3), pages 339-365, August.
    11. Paul, Catherine J Morrison & Siegel, Donald S, 2001. " The Impacts of Technology, Trade and Outsourcing on Employment and Labor Composition," Scandinavian Journal of Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 103(2), pages 241-64, June.
    12. Nickell, Stephen & Bell, Brian, 1995. "The Collapse in Demand for the Unskilled and Unemployment across the OECD," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 11(1), pages 40-62, Spring.
    13. Paul Segerstrom & Elias Dinopoulos, 1999. "A Schumpeterian Model of Protection and Relative Wages," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 89(3), pages 450-472, June.
    14. Lindbeck, Assar & Snower, Dennis J, 2000. "Multitask Learning and the Reorganization of Work: From Tayloristic to Holistic Organization," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 18(3), pages 353-76, July.
    15. Berman, Eli & Bound, John & Griliches, Zvi, 1994. "Changes in the Demand for Skilled Labor within U.S. Manufacturing: Evidence from the Annual Survey of Manufactures," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 109(2), pages 367-97, May.
    16. Hansson, Pär, 1996. "Trade, Technology and Changes in Employment of Skilled Labour in Swedish Manufacturing," Working Paper Series 131, Trade Union Institute for Economic Research.
    17. Bartel, Ann P & Lichtenberg, Frank R, 1987. "The Comparative Advantage of Educated Workers in Implementing New Technology," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 69(1), pages 1-11, February.
    18. Ours, J.C. van & Ridder, G., 1995. "Job Matching and Job Competition: Are Lower Educated Workers at the Back of Job Queues?," Open Access publications from Tilburg University urn:nbn:nl:ui:12-142162, Tilburg University.
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    Cited by:
    1. Lindquist, Matthew J., 2005. "Capital-Skill Complementarity and Inequality in Sweden," Working Paper Series 2/2005, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    2. Isacsson, Gunnar, 2005. "External effects of education on earnings: Swedish evidence using matched employee-establishment data," Working Paper Series 2005:10, IFAU - Institute for Evaluation of Labour Market and Education Policy.
    3. Isacsson, Gunnar & Regnér, Håkan, 2007. "Changes during the 1990's in the location of Swedish Power Couples: Consequences and Explanations," Working Paper Series 1/2007, Swedish Institute for Social Research.
    4. Savvidou, Eleni, 2003. "The Relationship Between Skilled Labor and Technical Change," Working Paper Series 2003:27, Uppsala University, Department of Economics.

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