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After Janjaweed? Socioeconomic Impacts of the Conflict in Darfur

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Author Info

  • Olsson, Ola

    ()
    (Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, Göteborg University)

Abstract

In this article, we use a unique database on 542 villages in southwestern Darfur to analyze patterns of population growth and land reallocation that have emerged as a consequence of the recent conflict. Our analysis demonstrates that a displacement from this region alone of more than 300,000 people from three targeted African groups has occurred and that villages have been repopulated by Arab and other African groups. Almost a fourth of all villages have been squatted by newly settled populations. The probability of squatting is shown to be largest in peripheral areas with good access to surface water, where soils are of good quality, and where many households from targeted tribes have fled. A key challenge in post-conflict reconstruction will therefore be the restoration of rights to land.

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/2077/21858
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics in its series Working Papers in Economics with number 429.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: 29 Jan 2010
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:hhs:gunwpe:0429

Contact details of provider:
Postal: Department of Economics, School of Business, Economics and Law, University of Gothenburg, Box 640, SE 405 30 GÖTEBORG, Sweden
Phone: 031-773 10 00
Web page: http://www.handels.gu.se/econ/
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Keywords: Population growth; land redistribution; reconstruction; Darfur;

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  1. Collier, Paul & Hoeffler, Anke, 2004. "Aid, policy and growth in post-conflict societies," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 48(5), pages 1125-1145, October.
  2. Olsson, Ola & Valsecchi, Michele, 2010. "Quantifying Ethnic Cleansing: An Application to Darfur," Working Papers in Economics 479, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  3. Mathias Czaika & Krisztina Kis-Katos, 2008. "Civil conflict and displacement Village-level determinants of forced migration in Aceh," Discussion Paper Series 4, Department of International Economic Policy, University of Freiburg, revised Apr 2008.
  4. Do, Quy-Toan & Iyer, Lakshmi, 2007. "Poverty, social divisions, and conflict in Nepal," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4228, The World Bank.
  5. Alberto Alesina & Arnaud Devleeschauwer & William Easterly & Sergio Kurlat & Romain Wacziarg, 2003. "Fractionalization," NBER Working Papers 9411, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  6. S. Mansoob Murshed & Scott Gates, 2005. "Spatial-Horizontal Inequality and the Maoist Insurgency in Nepal," Review of Development Economics, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 9(1), pages 121-134, 02.
  7. Olsson, Ola & Siba, Eyerusalem, 2009. "Ethnic Cleansing or Resource Struggle in Darfur? An empirical analysis," Working Papers in Economics 417, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
  8. Andre, Catherine & Platteau, Jean-Philippe, 1998. "Land relations under unbearable stress: Rwanda caught in the Malthusian trap," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 34(1), pages 1-47, January.
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Cited by:
  1. Falck, Oliver & Heblich, Stephan & Link, Susanne, 2011. "The Evils of Forced Migration: Do Integration Policies Alleviate Migrants' Economic Situations?," IZA Discussion Papers 5829, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  2. Niklas Potrafke, 2012. "Islam and democracy," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 151(1), pages 185-192, April.
  3. Daoud, Nihaya & Shankardass, Ketan & O’Campo, Patricia & Anderson, Kim & Agbaria, Ayman K., 2012. "Internal displacement and health among the Palestinian minority in Israel," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 74(8), pages 1163-1171.
  4. Olsson, Ola & Siba, Eyerusalem, 2013. "Ethnic cleansing or resource struggle in Darfur? An empirical analysis," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 103(C), pages 299-312.

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