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Physical Stature Decline and the Health Status of the Elderly Population in England

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  • Alan Fernihough

    ()
    (Institute for International Integration Studies, Trinity College Dublin)

  • Mark E. McGovern

    ()
    (Harvard School of Public Health)

Abstract

Few research papers in economics have examined the extent, causes or consequences of physical stature decline in aging populations. Using repeated observations on objectively measured data from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing (ELSA), we document that reduction in height is an important phenomenon among respondents aged 50 and over. On average, physical stature decline occurs at an annual rate of between 0.08% and 0.10% for males, and 0.12% and 0.14% for females — which approximately translates into a 2cm to 4cm reduction in height over the life course. Since height is commonly used as a measure of long-run health, our results demonstrate that failing to take age-related height loss into account substantially overstates the health advantage of older birth cohorts relative to their younger counterparts. We also show that there is an absence of consistent predictors of physical stature decline at the individual level. However, we demonstrate how deteriorating health and reductions in height occur simultaneously. We document that declines in muscle mass and bone density are likely to be the mechanism through which these effects are operating. If this physical stature decline is determined by deteriorating health in adulthood, the coefficient on a measured height when used as an input in a typical empirical health production function will be affected by reverse causality. While our analysis details the inherent difficulties associated with measuring height in older populations, we do not find that significant bias arises in typical empirical health productionfunctions from the use of height which has not been adjusted for physical stature decline. Therefore, our results validate the use of height among the population aged over 50.

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Paper provided by Program on the Global Demography of Aging in its series PGDA Working Papers with number 11214.

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Handle: RePEc:gdm:wpaper:11214

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Keywords: Height; Physical Stature Decline; Early Life Conditions; Health; Aging;

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Blog mentions

As found by EconAcademics.org, the blog aggregator for Economics research:
  1. Physical Stature Decline and the Health Status of the Elderly Population in England
    by Mark McGovern in Economics, Psychology and Policy on 2014-01-29 19:59:00
  2. Evidence on Stature Loss
    by Mark McGovern in Economics and Psychology Research on 2013-06-16 15:11:00

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