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How can safety nets do more with less?

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  • Haddad, Lawrence James
  • Zeller, Manfred

Abstract

This paper reviews design features by which safety nets might do more with less. It reviews the current evidence on their success in practice–including three brief reviews of southern Africa experience–and suggests a role for future policy research in furthering the goal of designing safety nets that reduce poverty in a cost-effective way. In doing so, the paper highlights a tension between the large gaps in our knowledge about the design of safety nets and the demand for short-run answers in this area.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI) in its series FCND discussion papers with number 16.

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Date of creation: 1996
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:fpr:fcnddp:16

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Related research

Keywords: Welfare economics ; Research ; Poverty alleviation ; FCND ;

References

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  1. Osmani, S R, 1994. "Economic Reform and Social Welfare: The Case of Nutrition in Sri Lanka," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 291-96, May.
  2. Strauss, J. & Thomas, D., 1995. "Empirical Modeling of Household and Family Decisions," Papers 95-12, RAND - Reprint Series.
  3. Kennedy, Eileen T. & Cogill, Bruce, 1987. "Income and nutritional effects of the commercialization of agriculture in southwestern Kenya:," Research reports 63, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  4. Teklu, Tesfaye & von Braun, Joachim & Zaki, Elsayed & Ali, Ahmed, 1991. "Drought and famine relationships in Sudan: policy implications," Research reports 88, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Brown, Lynn R. & Webb, Patrick & Haddad, Lawrence, 1994. "The role of labour in household food security: implications of AIDS in Africa," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 19(6), pages 568-573, December.
  6. Bouis, Howarth E. & Haddad, Lawrence James, 1990. "Effects of agricultural commercialization on land tenure, household resource allocation, and nutrition in the Philippines:," Research reports 79, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  7. Kumar, Shubh K., 1979. "Impact of subsidized rice on food consumption and nutrition in Kerala:," Research reports 5, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  8. Cornia, Giovanni Andrea, 1994. "Poverty, Food Consumption, and Nutrition during the Transition to the Market Economy in Eastern Europe," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 297-302, May.
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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Ruel, Marie T. & Haddad, Lawrence James & Garrett, James L., 1999. "Some urban facts of life," FCND discussion papers 64, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  2. Haddad, Lawrence James & Oshaug, Arne, 1999. "How does the human rights perspective help to shape the food and nutrition policy research agenda?," FCND discussion papers 56, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  3. Beatrice Lorge Rogers & Jennifer Coates, 2002. "Food-Based Safety Nets and Related Programs," Working Papers in Food Policy and Nutrition 12, Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy.
  4. Jeanty, P. Wilner & Ulimwengu, John Mususa, 2011. "Poverty rate and government income transfers: A spatial simultaneous equations approach," IFPRI discussion papers 1076, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  5. Haddad, Lawrence James & Peña, Christine & Nishida, Chizuru & Quisumbing, Agnes R. & Slack, Alison T., 1996. "Food security and nutrition implications of intrahousehold bias," FCND discussion papers 19, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  6. Morduch, Jonathan, 1999. "Between the State and the Market: Can Informal Insurance Patch the Safety Net?," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 14(2), pages 187-207, August.
  7. Brunori, Paolo & O'Reilly, Marie, 2010. "Social protection for development: a review of definitions," MPRA Paper 29495, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Brown, Lynn & Gentilini, Ugo, 2006. "On the Edge: The Role of Food-based Safety Nets in Helping Vulnerable Households Manage Food Insecurity," Working Paper Series RP2006/111, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

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