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Trend inflation and inflation persistence in the New Keynesian Phillips curve

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  • Timothy Cogley
  • Argia M. Sbordone

Abstract

The New Keynesian Phillips curve (NKPC) asserts that inflation depends on expectations of real marginal costs, but empirical research has shown that purely forward-looking versions of the model generate too little inflation persistence. In this paper, we offer a resolution of the persistence problem. We hypothesize that inflation is highly persistent because of drift in trend inflation, a feature that many versions of the NKPC neglect. We derive a version of the NKPC as a log-linear approximation around a time-varying inflation trend and examine whether it explains deviations of inflation from that trend. We estimate the NKPC parameters jointly with those that define the inflation trend by estimating a vector autoregression with drifting coefficients and volatilities; the autoregressive parameters are constrained to satisfy the restrictions imposed by the NKPC. Our results suggest that trend inflation has been historically quite volatile and that a purely forward-looking model that takes these fluctuations into account approximates well the short-run dynamics of inflation.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Federal Reserve Bank of New York in its series Staff Reports with number 270.

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Date of creation: 2006
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Handle: RePEc:fip:fednsr:270

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Keywords: Phillips curve ; Inflation (Finance);

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References

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  1. I must be crazy
    by pushmedia1 in The Ambrosini Critique on 2009-12-18 21:24:01
  2. Modern macro models are falsifiable
    by pushmedia1 in The Ambrosini Critique on 2009-02-05 20:19:14
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