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World Development Report 2007 Development and the Next Generation

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    Abstract

    The Report examines five pivotal phases of life that can help unleash the development of young people’s potential with the right government policies: learning, working, staying healthy, forming families, and exercising citizenship. Within each of these transitions, governments need not only to increase investments directly but also to cultivate an environment for young people and their families to invest in themselves. The Report identifi es three policy directions for helping youth develop themselves and contribute to society: expanding opportunities, enhancing capabilities, and providing second chances.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by eSocialSciences in its series Working Papers with number id:1755.

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    Date of creation: Nov 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:ess:wpaper:id:1755

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    Related research

    Keywords: potential; learning; working; development; young; people; governments; south asia; India; nepal; latin america; policies; healthy; citizenship families; environment; opportunities; invest; family; investments;

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    1. Sawada, Yasayuki & Lokshin, Michael, 2001. "Household schooling decisions in rural Pakistan," Policy Research Working Paper Series 2541, The World Bank.
    2. Emiliana Vegas & Ilana Umansky, 2005. "Improving Teaching and Learning through Effective Incentives : What Can We Learn from Education Reforms in Latin America?," World Bank Other Operational Studies 8694, The World Bank.
    3. Pieter Serneels, 2004. "The Nature of Unemployment in Urban Ethiopia," Economics Series Working Papers WPS/2004-01, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    4. Howard White & Edoardo Masset & Nina Blondal & Hugh Waddington, 2005. "Maintaining Momentum to 2015? An impact evaluation of interventions to improve maternal and child health and nutrition in Bangladesh," Development and Comp Systems 0510004, EconWPA.
    5. Robert H. Topel & Michael P. Ward, 1988. "Job Mobility and the Careers of Young Men," NBER Working Papers 2649, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    6. Robert Sparrow, 2005. "Protecting Education for the Poor in Times of Crisis: An Evaluation of a Scholarship Program in Indonesia," Development and Comp Systems 0501009, EconWPA.
    7. T. Paul Schultz, 2004. "Evidence of Returns to Schooling in Africa from Household Surveys: Monitoring and Restructuring the Market for Education," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 13(02), pages ii95-ii148, December.
    8. Tan, Jee-Peng & Lane, Julia & Lassibille, Gerard, 1999. "Student Outcomes in Philippine Elementary Schools: An Evaluation of Four Experiments," World Bank Economic Review, World Bank Group, vol. 13(3), pages 493-508, September.
    9. Smith, Patricia K. & Bogin, Barry & Bishai, David, 2005. "Are time preference and body mass index associated?: Evidence from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth," Economics & Human Biology, Elsevier, vol. 3(2), pages 259-270, July.
    10. Bruce Sacerdote, 2000. "Peer Effects with Random Assignment: Results for Dartmouth Roommates," NBER Working Papers 7469, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Strauss, John & Thomas, Duncan, 1995. "Human resources: Empirical modeling of household and family decisions," Handbook of Development Economics, in: Hollis Chenery & T.N. Srinivasan (ed.), Handbook of Development Economics, edition 1, volume 3, chapter 34, pages 1883-2023 Elsevier.
    12. David C. Stapleton & Richard V. Burkhauser (ed.), 2003. "The Decline in Employment of People with Disabilities: A Policy Puzzle," Books from Upjohn Press, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, number depd.
    13. Tzannatos, Zafiris, 1999. "Women and Labor Market Changes in the Global Economy: Growth Helps, Inequalities Hurt and Public Policy Matters," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(3), pages 551-569, March.
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    Cited by:
    1. Hari Ram Lohano, 2009. "Poverty Dynamics in Rural Sindh, Pakistan," Working Papers id:2334, eSocialSciences.
    2. Rachel Sabates-Wheeler, 2009. "The Impact of Irregular Status on Human Development Outcomes for Migrants," Human Development Research Papers (2009 to present) HDRP-2009-26, Human Development Report Office (HDRO), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), revised Jul 2009.

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