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Why Are Power Couples Increasingly Concentrated in Large Metropolitan Areas?

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  • Janice Compton
  • Robert A. Pollak

Abstract

Using the Panel Study of Income Dynamics (PSID), we test Costa and Kahn’s colocation hypothesis, which predicts that power couples—couples in which both spouses have college degrees—are more likely to migrate to the largest cities than part-power couples or power singles. We find no support for this hypothesis. Instead, regression analyses suggest that only the education of the husband and not the joint education profile of the couple affects the propensity to migrate to large metropolitan areas. The observed location trends are better explained by higher rates of power couple formation in larger metropolitan areas.

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Bibliographic Info

Article provided by University of Chicago Press in its journal Journal of Labor Economics.

Volume (Year): 25 (2007)
Issue (Month): ()
Pages: 475-512

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Handle: RePEc:ucp:jlabec:v:25:y:2007:p:475-512

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