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Friends’ networks and job finding rates

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  • Cappellari, Lorenzo
  • Tatsiramos, Konstantinos

Abstract

Social interactions have important consequences for labour market outcomes. Yet the growing literature has relied on indirect definitions of networks. We present the first evidence based on direct information on friends networks. We address issues of correlated effects with instrumental variables and panel data. We find large network effects, which persist even after controlling for family networks. One additional employed friend increases a persons job finding probability by approximately 13 percent. This is a result of endogenous social interactions. We also provide the first evidence that network effects operate through information transmission rather than through social norms or leisure complementarities.

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File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/publications/working-papers/iser/2011-21.pdf
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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2011-21.

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Date of creation: 10 Aug 2011
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2011-21

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
Phone: 44-1206-872957
Fax: 44-1206-873151
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Web page: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/
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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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References

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Citations

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Cited by:
  1. Carlos Carrillo-Tudela & Eric Smith, 2012. "Search Capital," CESifo Working Paper Series 3741, CESifo Group Munich.
  2. repec:ese:iserwp:2013-24 is not listed on IDEAS
  3. Bachmann, Ronald & Baumgarten, Daniel, 2012. "How Do the Unemployed Search for a Job? Evidence from the EU Labour Force Survey," IZA Discussion Papers 6753, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  4. Marco Caliendo & Ricarda Schmidl & Arne Uhlendorff, 2011. "Social networks, job search methods and reservation wages: evidence for Germany," International Journal of Manpower, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 32(7), pages 796-824, November.
  5. M. Deidda & A. Di Liberto & M. Foddi & G. Sulis, 2012. "Employment Subsidies, Informal Economy and Women’s Transition into Work in a Depressed Area: Evidence from a Matching Approach," Working Paper CRENoS 201216, Centre for North South Economic Research, University of Cagliari and Sassari, Sardinia.
  6. Effrosyni Adamopoulou & Ezgi Kaya, 2013. "Young adults living with their parents and the influence of peers," Economics Working Papers we1310, Universidad Carlos III, Departamento de Economía.

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