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Unionization and sickness absence from work in the UK

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  • Veliziotis, Michail

Abstract

Does union membership increase sickness absence from work and, if so, by how much? And which specific channels does this effect operate through? Using UK Labour Force Survey data for 2006-2008 we find that trade union membership is associated with a substantial increase in the probability of reporting sick and in the amount of average absence taken. This result can be largely attributed to the protection that unions offer to unionized employees. Supportive evidence is also found for a reduction in presenteeism (attending work when sick) among union members. The results are robust to different modelling and estimation approaches.

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Bibliographic Info

Paper provided by Institute for Social and Economic Research in its series ISER Working Paper Series with number 2010-15.

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Date of creation: 10 May 2010
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Publication status: published
Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-15

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Postal: Publications Office, Institute for Social and Economic Research, University of Essex, Wivenhoe Park, Colchester, Essex CO4 3SQ UK
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  1. repec:ese:iserwp:2008-29 is not listed on IDEAS
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Cited by:
  1. Laszlo Goerke & Markus Pannenberg, 2012. "Trade Union Membership and Sickness Absence: Evidence from a Sick Pay Reform," IAAEU Discussion Papers 201207, Institute of Labour Law and Industrial Relations in the European Union (IAAEU).

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