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Absenteeism in the UK: A Comparison Across Genders

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  • Sarah Bridges
  • Karen Mumford

Abstract

We analyse an empirical model of absence from work based upon a variant of the traditional work-leisure model of labour supply. The model is tested with data from the 1993 UK Family Expenditure Survey (FES) and a comparison of absenteeism is made across genders. We find substantial differences in the probability of absenteeism across gender and various family situations. It appears that it is marital status rather than the presence of children that is driving this gender difference. We also find that our conclusions concerning gender differences in absenteeism are sensitive to the definition of absenteeism used and that the differences in the determination of these measures may help to explain some of the existing disagreements in the literature.

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Paper provided by Department of Economics, University of York in its series Discussion Papers with number 00/12.

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Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:00/12

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Keywords: absenteeism; gender differences.;

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Cited by:
  1. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Thierry Debrand, 2011. "Durée d’arrêt de travail, salaire et Assurance maladie : application microéconométrique à partir de la base Hygie," Working Papers DT42, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Sep 2011.
  2. Moral De Blas, Alfonso & Corrales-Herrero, Helena & Martín-Román, Ángel, 2012. "Glass Ceiling or Slippery Floors? Understanding Gender Differences in the Spanish Worker’s Compensation System/¿Techo de cristal o suelo resbaladizo? Comprendiendo las diferencias de género en el ," Estudios de Economía Aplicada, Estudios de Economía Aplicada, vol. 30, pages 311-340, Abril.
  3. Ichino, Andrea & Moretti, Enrico, 2006. "Biological Gender Differences, Absenteeism and the Earning Gap," CEPR Discussion Papers 5785, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  4. De Paola, Maria, 2008. "Absenteeism and Peer Interaction Effects: Evidence from an Italian Public Institute," MPRA Paper 11425, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  5. Jahangir Khan & Clas Rehnberg, 2009. "Perceived job security and sickness absence: a study on moral hazard," The European Journal of Health Economics, Springer, vol. 10(4), pages 421-428, October.
  6. Bradley, Steve & Green, Colin & Leeves, Gareth, 2007. "Worker absence and shirking: Evidence from matched teacher-school data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(3), pages 319-334, June.
  7. Zhang, Xuelin, 2007. "Differences entre les sexes relativement aux departs volontaires et a l'absenteisme au Canada," Direction des etudes analytiques : documents de recherche 2007296f, Statistics Canada, Direction des etudes analytiques.
  8. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Thierry Debrand & Camille Regaert, 2012. "Sick Leaves: Understanding Disparities Between French Departments," Working Papers DT50, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Oct 2012.
  9. Mohamed Ali Ben Halima & Thierry Debrand & Camille Regaert, 2011. "Arrêts maladie : comprendre les disparités départementales," Working Papers DT39, IRDES institut for research and information in health economics, revised Feb 2011.
  10. repec:ese:iserwp:2010-15 is not listed on IDEAS
  11. Matthias Weiss, 2008. "Sick Leave and the Composition of Work Teams," MEA discussion paper series 07149, Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy.
  12. Heywood, John S. & Jirjahn, Uwe & Wei, Xiangdong, 2008. "Teamwork, monitoring and absence," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 68(3-4), pages 676-690, December.
  13. Melanie K. Jones & Richard J. Jones & Paul L. Latreille & Peter J. Sloane, 2009. "Training, Job Satisfaction, and Workplace Performance in Britain: Evidence from WERS 2004," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 23(s1), pages 139-175, 03.
  14. Zhang, Xuelin, 2007. "Gender Differences in Quits and Absenteeism in Canada," Analytical Studies Branch Research Paper Series 2007296e, Statistics Canada, Analytical Studies Branch.

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