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Can labour supply explain the rise in unemployment and intergroup wage inequality in the OECD?

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  • E. Wasmer
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    Abstract

    This paper investigates how labour supply trends might have affected the OECD labour markets in the last decades. It is argued that changes in supply cannot be considered as homogenous: they involve more young and more adult female workers, who are complements with skilled men and substitutes with low-wage groups (young, unskilled). Such labour supply trends since the ''50s may have increased competition between women, young workers and low skilled workers in some segments of the labour force. These mechanisms are described by a model and an empirical strategy is undertaken to test its predictions. Disaggregation by gender is necessary. Endogeneity of participation levels with respect to unemployment is treated in two ways, by instrumental variables estimators, and with time series techniques. Significant causal relations between participation and unemployment cannot be rejected.

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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/20245/
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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library in its series LSE Research Online Documents on Economics with number 20245.

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    Length: 31 pages
    Date of creation: Nov 1998
    Date of revision:
    Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:20245

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    Related research

    Keywords: Labour Supply; Unemployment;

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    1. Bean, Charles R, 1994. "European Unemployment: A Survey," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 32(2), pages 573-619, June.
    2. Katz, Lawrence F & Murphy, Kevin M, 1992. "Changes in Relative Wages, 1963-1987: Supply and Demand Factors," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 107(1), pages 35-78, February.
    3. Olivier J. Blanchard & Lawrence H. Summers, 1986. "Hysteresis And The European Unemployment Problem," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1986, Volume 1, pages 15-90 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    4. Banerjee, Anindya & Dolado, Juan J. & Galbraith, John W. & Hendry, David, 1993. "Co-integration, Error Correction, and the Econometric Analysis of Non-Stationary Data," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198288107, September.
    5. Hendry, David F., 1995. "Dynamic Econometrics," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198283164, September.
    6. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-42, June.
    7. Topel, Robert H, 1994. "Regional Labor Markets and the Determinants of Wage Inequality," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 17-22, May.
    8. Clark, Kim B & Summers, Lawrence H, 1982. "Labour Force Participation: Timing and Persistence," Review of Economic Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 49(5), pages 825-44, Special I.
    9. Pissarides, C., 1988. "Unemployment Consequences Of An Aging Population: An Application Of Insider-Outsider Theory," Papers 327, London School of Economics - Centre for Labour Economics.
    10. Kevin M. Murphy & Robert H. Topel, 1987. "The Evolution of Unemployment in the United States: 1968 — 1985," NBER Chapters, in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1987, Volume 2, pages 11-68 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Mincer, Jacob, 1985. "Intercountry Comparisons of Labor Force Trends and of Related Developments: An Overview," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 3(1), pages S1-32, January.
    12. Nickell, S., 1991. "Wages, Unemployment and Population Change," Economics Series Working Papers 99122, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
    13. repec:fth:prinin:355 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Layard, Richard & Nickell, Stephen & Jackman, Richard, 2005. "Unemployment: Macroeconomic Performance and the Labour Market," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199279173, September.
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