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Recalling Mixed Emotions

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  • Aaker, Jennifer L.

    (Stanford U)

  • Drolet, Aimee L.

    (U of California, Los Angeles)

  • Griffin, Dale
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    Abstract

    In two longitudinal experiments, conducted both in the field and lab, we investigated the recollection of mixed emotions. Results demonstrated that the intensity of mixed emotions is generally underestimated at the time of recall--an effect that increases over time and does not occur to the same degree with unipolar emotions. Of note, the decline in memory of mixed emotions is distinct from the pattern found for memory of negative emotions, implying that the recall bias is diagnostic of the complexity of mixed emotions rather than of any association with negative affect. Finally, the memory decay effect was driven by the felt conflict aroused by the experience of mixed emotions.

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    Bibliographic Info

    Paper provided by Stanford University, Graduate School of Business in its series Research Papers with number 1913.

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    Date of creation: Apr 2008
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    Handle: RePEc:ecl:stabus:1913

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    1. Kahneman, Daniel & Wakker, Peter P & Sarin, Rakesh, 1997. "Back to Bentham? Explorations of Experienced Utility," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, MIT Press, vol. 112(2), pages 375-405, May.
    2. Loraine Lau-Gesk, 2005. "Understanding Consumer Evaluations of Mixed Affective Experiences," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 32(1), pages 23-28, 06.
    3. Eduardo B. Andrade & Joel B. Cohen, 2007. "On the Consumption of Negative Feelings," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(3), pages 283-300, 06.
    4. Suresh Ramanathan & Patti Williams, 2007. "Immediate and Delayed Emotional Consequences of Indulgence: The Moderating Influence of Personality Type on Mixed Emotions," Journal of Consumer Research, University of Chicago Press, vol. 34(2), pages 212-223, 05.
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    Cited by:
    1. Ursavas, Baris & Hesapci-Sanaktekin, Ozlem, 2013. "What happens when you're lost between happiness and sadness?," Journal of Business Research, Elsevier, vol. 66(7), pages 933-940.
    2. Rothman, Naomi B., 2011. "Steering sheep: How expressed emotional ambivalence elicits dominance in interdependent decision making contexts," Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Elsevier, vol. 116(1), pages 66-82, September.

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