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Growth, History and Institutions

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  • Bertocchi, Graziella

Abstract

We illustrate the ongoing research line on Growth, History, and Institutions, which adds to economic growth analysis a historical and an institutional dimension, both at the theoretical and the empirical level. We present applications of this research strategy to the impact of colonization on growth, the extension of the franchise and the welfare state, the evolution of educational systems, the relationship between industrialization and democratization, and international migration. We propose a new standard, starting from 1870, as the future reference period for theoretical and empirical research on growth. We conclude with policy implications of the Growth, History, and Institutions research line.

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Paper provided by C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers in its series CEPR Discussion Papers with number 4738.

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Date of creation: Nov 2004
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Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:4738

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Keywords: growth; history; institutions;

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Cited by:
  1. Fali Huang, 2007. "The Coevolution of Economic and Political Development from Monarchy to Democracy," Working Papers 07-2007, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  2. Fali Huang, 2006. "The Coevolution of Economic and Political Development," Working Papers 22-2006, Singapore Management University, School of Economics.
  3. Bertocchi, Graziella, 2011. "Growth, Colonization, and Institutional Development: In and Out of Africa," IZA Discussion Papers 5856, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

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